Pekah


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Pekah

(pē`kə), in the Bible, king of Israel. He was a general under King Pekahiah and murdered him for the throne. As the head of an anti-Assyrian coalition, he went to war with Ahaz of Judah. Ahaz requested and received help from Tiglathpileser III, and as a result Pekah lost the northern and eastern parts of his kingdom to Assyria. His successor was Hoshea.
References in periodicals archive ?
28:16-21, where instead of Assyria acting as Ahaz's deliverer from the siege of Pekah and Rezin (cf.
15:14); and Menahem's son, Pekahiah, is murdered by Pekah (II Kgs.
In short, no less than eight of 19 kings are assassinated (42%): Nadab, Elah, Zimri, Joram, Zechariah, Shallum, Pekahiah, Pekah, each murdered by his successor; while 13 (fully 68%) either assassinate others, are themselves assassinated, or both.
During the brief reign of Pekah, the king of Israel was persuaded by Rezin, the king of Aram-Damascus to form a coalition, which Judah refused to join, in order to resist the growing strength of the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III.
(2) These Isaiah chapters address a situation of imperial threat that King Ahaz of Judah faces from Kings Rezin and Pekah of Syria and Israel and from the super-power Assyria.
734 BCE about the imminent birth of a son to a then-pregnant mother, who would call him (karat) Immanuel ("With-us-is-El"), who would be a sign to Ahaz and the house of Judah that Rezin and Pekah would be soon defeated, rather than a far-term prophecy of the birth of the Messiah non-metaphorically-God-fathered and betulah-born.
According to the Hebrew Bible, King Ahaz of Judah, who appealed to Tiglath-pileser III for help against Rezin of Aram and Pekah of Israel, undertook building measures in the temple to please the Assyrian king.
Pekah became King of Israel in 732 BCE and entered into an alliance with Rezin, King of Aram (Syria) in an attempt to stem the tide of Assyrian aggression.
Hoshea, who assassinated Pekah, was crowned King of Israel and submitted to Assyria.
Ahaz 16 "Rezin, King of Aram, and Pekah, son of Remaliah, King of Israel, went up against Jerusalem to wage war and they besieged Ahaz, but they could not conquer him.
Finally, II Kings 16:5-10 depicts King Pekah of Israel allied with Aram, besieging Jerusalem to coerce Judah to join their front against Assyria (the so-called Syro-Ephraimite War).
In addition to utilizing these principles, Galil concludes that the regnal years recorded for two of the kings, Pekah of Israel and Jehoash of Judah, apparently were calculated retroactively.