Pelagius

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Related to Pelagians: Manichees

Pelagius

?360--?420 ad, British monk, who originated the body of doctrines known as Pelagianism and was condemned for heresy (417)
References in periodicals archive ?
illustrates Augustine's gradual development of the theme of prayer as a liturgical argument against the Pelagians and shows how their doctrine of grace amounts to the denial of the real significance of prayer.
He liked to quote sociologist Ernest van den Haag to the effect that both students and teachers had succumbed to "America's Pelagian heresy.
In sum, all the essential elements of the Pelagian and Manichean controversies coexist in Augustine, which, looked at historically, have gone far beyond the epoch in which the Bishop of Hippo worked and are involved in successive interpretations of the relationship between nature and grace, a relationship over which the debate on modernity has played out and still plays out.
Given Augustine's belief in original sin, which had ruined Adam and his descendants and which the Pelagians denied, there was little possibility of any compromise between him and his opponents.
Yet, Elshtain's portrait is of a decidedly gentler figure than - in the mind of this reviewer, at any rate - the fiery African, with his tireless attacks on Manicheans, Donatists, Pelagians, and pagans of all sorts, really was.
For the remainder of his life, he preached and wrote prolifically, defining points of Christian doctrine and engaging in theological controversy with the Manichaeans, the Donatists, and the Pelagians.
Scholars in the past have said, for example, that Augustine's De trinitate was a work of speculative theology not written in controversy with others, as his works against the Manichees, Donatists, and Pelagians clearly were.
Augustine's writings against the Pelagians were also influential in so far as they argued for certain cooperation with the workings of divine grace.
Pelagius was not excommunicated for denying limbo--rather, the position affirming the existence of limbo was ascribed to the Pelagians and condemned at a council at Carthage in 418.
460, Feast Day July 7), never ordained but sanctified for his theological support of Augustine against the Pelagians in prose and verse and his later secretarial work for Pope Leo I; cf.
In fashioning a theological, scriptural, and political legitimation for the idea of the church as a school for sinners Augustine was able to withstand the claims of both Donatists and Pelagians to insist upon or create the perfect church on earth and thus provided a definition for the church that was to serve not only Augustine's time but that of generations to come.
95--Given that his writings span well over forty years of maturing genius and that the audiences to whom these writings were directed were as varied as the Pelagians, Donatists, and Manichees, not to mention the Sunday flock, is it any wonder that Augustine's thought found a home in Wittenberg as well as in Trent?