Pelagius

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Related to Pelagians: Manichees

Pelagius

?360--?420 ad, British monk, who originated the body of doctrines known as Pelagianism and was condemned for heresy (417)
References in periodicals archive ?
GRATIA IN AUGUSTINE'S SERMONES AD POPULUM DURING THE PELAGIAN CONTROVERSY: DO DIFFERENT CONTEXTS FURNISH DIFFERENT INSIGHTS?
120) This was not wholly systematic divinity; in part preachers were developing market-driven defences against both old pelagian and new anti-Calvinist forms of universalism.
20) For a complete picture of successive interpretations of the Pelagian controversy--semi-Pelagian, predestinarian, Lutheran, Baiana, Jansenist, Neopelagian, of Church teaching and Catholic theology, cf.
Germanus, written by Constantius of Lyon, who writes that his protagonist successfully demolished the Pelagian party during his visit to Britain in 429 together with Lupus of Troyes.
Godly bishops intervened and suppressed the Pelagian heresy in late fifth-century Britain.
As I shall argue, the bishop of Hippo looms large for the Beechers because of their position at a peculiarly Augustinian moment in New England history--a time when perennial themes from the Pelagian and other controversies of late antiquity resurfaced as elite Protestants struggled to define and maintain republican virtue in the face of perceived societal decay.
His articulation of those teachings was in response to the heresies of the Manichaeans and Pelagians, but they also reveal the impact of his own life experiences, especially his relationship with his concubine.
Peter charged the Arians with dividing the Trinity, the Macedonians with the same, the Sabellians with confusing the unity of the Trinity, the Donatists with claiming to be the only true church, the Pelagians with relying on works not grace, and the Nestorians and Eutychians with denying the full divinity and humanity of Christ.
Thomas was the problem bequeathed to the Middle Ages by Augustine in his writings against the Pelagians who taught that divine grace was meted out according to the previous merits of good will.
It may be that some of us have adopted the twin of Luther's error and become Pelagians, proceeding on the false assumption that we can make our way on our own merits.
The Pelagians regarded grace as useful, even necessary, to aid us in the exercise of human freedom, but mainly because our freedom has bee "rusted over" by bad habits.
For example, chapter five traces the rise of orthodoxy through its successive encounters with Gnostics, Montanists, Donatists, Arians, Manichees, and Pelagians.