Pelasgians

(redirected from Pelasgian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Pelasgians

 

according to ancient tradition, pre-Greek inhabitants of ancient Greece. Evidence of their existence has been found in Thessaly and Epirus and on Crete, the southern Balkan Peninsula, the islands of the Aegean Sea, and the western coast of Asia Minor. Archaeological excavations have confirmed the closeness of the cultures of the pre-Greek inhabitants of all these regions.

REFERENCES

Georgiev, V. “Istoriia Egeiskogo mira vo II tys. do n.e.” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1950, no. 4.
Tiumenev, A. I. “K voprosu ob etnogeneze grecheskogo naroda.” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1953, no. 4; 1954, no. 4.
Lochner-Hüttenbach, F. Die Pelasger. Vienna, 1960.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is another example of second language learning when some young Pelasgian men from Lemnos abducted some Athenian women and had children by them (6.
The city of Cyzicus was probably founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later it received many colonies from Miletus, allegedly in 756 BC, but its importance began only after the Peloponnesian war, when the decay of Athens and Miletus set in.
Some say that the Pelasgians, having wandered most of the inhabitable earth and having conquered most of it, settled in that place, and they named the city thus because of their strength ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in arms.
By positing continuity from semi-mythical Pelasgians (mentioned by Homer and Herodotus) and asserting that ancient Macedonia, Epirus and Illyria were in some sense Albanian states, they devised a list of precursors for Zog which included Achilles, Alexander the Great, Pyrrhus and Queen Teuta.
Herodotus comments early in his history that Greece was originally occupied by Pelasgians who spoke a non-Greek language.
The Greek seems to be, in a great measure, a simple, uncompounded language, formed from the primitive jargon of those wandering savages, the ancient Hellenians and Pelasgians, from whom the Greek nation is said to have been descended.
The phrase, `they had never yet migrated', could hardly refer to the Pelasgians by contrast with the Hellenes,(13) but well suits the Athenians contrasted with the Spartans: and as for the shift from [Greek Words Omitted] to [Greek Words Omitted], there is one similarly abrupt, though in the other direction, at 4.
35) Hellanicus in his Phoronis included a history of the legendary Pelasgians and enumerated their kings.
In the Juventus the emphasis on nationality was even stronger, because he began by describing the pastoral and cultivating Pelasgians as the indigenous inhabitants of both the Greek and Italian peninsulas and the Achaians as a greater people coming in from outside, eventually, he suggested, to absorb them.