Pelatiah

Pelatiah

(pĕl'ətī`ə), in the Bible. 1 Zerubbabel's grandson. 2 Simeonite captain. 3 Signer of the Covenant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Boston-born Pelatiah Webster's magisterial treatises on money, finance, and governance framed many of the debates over solutions to the problems of the money supply that were discussed by, among others, John Witherspoon (Scotland) and William Barton (Philadelphia).
Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University.
Pelatiah Webster, a Philadelphia merchant and economist, argued that those customs duties were "voluntary" taxes, since no person was "compelled to pay any of the taxes, unless he chooses to be concerned in the articles taxed" [Webster, 1791, p.
Pelatiah Webster of Philadelphia reflected common understanding when, in 1780, he wrote:
JOSEPH HAMBURGER, the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University at the time of his death in 1997, was one of America's most accomplished scholars of nineteenth-century British political thought.
concurring) (relying on Blackstone for proposition that corporate charter granted by government includes implied promise not to grant another identical franchise which would prejudice the grant); Pelatiah Webster, An Essay on Credit in which the Doctrine of Banks is Considered and Some Remarks Are Made on the Present State of the Bank of North America (Feb.
Its author, Joseph Hamburger, Pelatiah Petit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University, died in 1997, leaving a manuscript that "was almost ready for publication" (ix), in the words of his posthumous editor "P.
In 1781, even before the United States had won its independence, Pelatiah Webster voiced concern that valuable acres would fall into private hands without payment of fair consideration.
The effect of prompt redemption, argued Pelatiah Webster, would be "that very few .
1: 133; Pelatiah Webster, "A Citizen of Philadelphia [1787], in Ibid.
22) Pelatiah Webster, "Journal of a Visit to Charleston, 1765", in The Colonial South Carolina Scene: Contemporary Views, 1697-1774, ed.
Pelatiah Webster, a Philadelphia merchant and proponent of ratification, described the sphere of state authority in less than pleasant terms: