Pelet

Pelet

(pē`lĕt). 1 Name in an obscure genealogy. 1 Chron. 2.47. 2 Benjamite leader with David. 1 Chron. 12.3.
References in classic literature ?
Brown, "I think I can promise you the place, for Monsieur Pelet will not refuse a professor recommended by me; but come here again at five o'clock this afternoon, and I will introduce you to him."
Pelet had engaged me were really liberal for Brussels; instruction being extremely cheap there on account of the number of teachers.
Pelet was no Fleming, but a Frenchman both by birth and parentage), yet the degree of harshness inseparable from Gallic lineaments was, in his case, softened by a mild blue eye, and a melancholy, almost suffering, expression of countenance; his physiognomy was "fine et spirituelle." I use two French words because they define better than any English terms the species of intelligence with which his features were imbued.
Pelet, a profound silence reigned on all sides, and if by chance a murmur or a whisper arose, one glance from the pensive eye of this most gentle pedagogue stilled it instantly.
Pelet conducted me to my apartment, my "chambre," as Monsieur said with a certain air of complacency.
Pelet had retired and closed the door after him, the first thing I did was to scrutinize closely the nailed boards, hoping to find some chink or crevice which I might enlarge, and so get a peep at the consecrated ground.
Pelet's establishment, the combined insubordination of the pupils had effected the dismissal of more than one English master.
Several people got injured because of firing, pelet guns and tear gas and they don't have treatment facilities.
One of these comprises scale models of great Roman buildings sculpted in cork by Auguste Pelet, a Nimes businessman-turned-classical-enthusiast who showed these miniature monuments at the Universal Exhibition in 1839- It's interesting to see how the Nimes amphitheatre compares to the Colosseum --smaller, needless to say, but not by such a long way.