Pelopidas


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Related to Pelopidas: Phocis, Leuctra, Callisthenes

Pelopidas

(pĭlŏp`ĭdəs), d. 364 B.C., Theban general. When the Spartans seized the citadel of Thebes (now Thívai) in 382, he fled to Athens and prepared the coup that recovered the city (379). He fostered and commanded the Sacred Band, an elite corps that sparked the Theban victories against Sparta at Tegyra (375) and Leuctra (371). Under Epaminondas he joined in the invasion (370–369) of the Peloponnesus. On an expedition into Macedon (368) he was captured by the Thessalian Alexander of Pherae, but Epaminondas rescued him. Pelopidas went the next year to Persia as ambassador to Artaxerxes. He was killed at the hour of victory in a battle with the Thessalians at Cynoscephalae (now Khalkodhónion hills). Plutarch wrote his life.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pelopidas

 

Born circa 410 B.C., in Thebes; died 364 B.C. Ancient Greek statesman and general.

Pelopidas helped organize an anti-Spartan democratic coup in Thebes in 379 B.C. In 378 B.C. and in subsequent years he was repeatedly elected boeotarch, one of the chief magistrates of the Boeotian League. Under his leadership the Thebans were victorious over the Spartans at Tanagra in 377 and Tegyra in 375. In 371 B.C., Pelopidas played an important role in routing the Spartans at Leuctra, and in 369 B.C. he led the Thebans against Macedonia and the tyrant Alexander of Pherae. He was killed in a battle against the latter at Cynoscephalae.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) In addition to the few references to Epaminondas in the Life of Agesilaus, Plutarch describes several actions of Epaminondas in his Life of Pelopidas (a contemporary Theban leader).
The basis for Hardy's play is a very scant account from the life of Pelopidas, the Theban leader, who, leading troops against the Spartans, had a vision nearby the tombs of Scedasus's daughters: "Il y a en celle campagne des sepultures des filles d'un Scedasus, que Ion appelle, a cause du lieu, les Leuctrides, pource quelles y furent enterrees, apres avoir este violees & forcees par des hostes Spartiates passans: cest acte estant si malheureux & si meschant, le pere neantmoins n'en peut avoir reparation ny vengeance en Lacedemoine, & pourtant apres avoir mauldit les Lacedemoniens des plus horribles & plus execrables maledictions 8c imprecations, dont il se peut adviser, il se tua luy mesme dessus les tumbeaux de ses filles."
Pelopidas is heavily bankrolled by retired investment executive Rex Sinquefield, who currently is footing a more than $2 million advertising campaign in Missouri aimed at persuading the Republican-led Legislature to override Democratic Gov.
Benot Pelopidas, "French Nuclear Idiosyncrasy: How It Affects French Nuclear Policies Towards the United Arab Emirates" [143-169]
(46) Didier Chaudet, Florent Parmentier, Benoit Pelopidas, Imperiul in oglinda.
Pelopidas thrax (Hubner)--the Millet Skipper- is a widespread skipper butterfly found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, Cyprus, Egypt and the Middle East to Pakistan.
That this was the real issue was suggested by the Theban Pelopidas, who offers the most contemporary interpretation of the incident.
See PLUTARCH, LIFE OF PELOPIDAS (Bernadotte Perrin trans., Harv.