Pelops


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Related to Pelops: Atreus, Thyestes

Pelops

(pē`lŏps), in Greek mythology, son of Tantalus. He was murdered by his father, who served his flesh at a banquet for the gods. The gods recognized this abominable trick, punished Tantalus and restored Pelops, giving him an ivory shoulder to replace the one Demeter had unwittingly eaten. He won his wife, Hippodamia, by defeating her father, King Oenomaus of Pisa, in a chariot race. To ensure victory Pelops not only used a winged chariot given to him by Poseidon, but he bribed Myrtilus, Oenomaus' charioteer, to betray his master. After winning the race Pelops would not pay Myrtilus his reward. Instead, he threw him into the sea. Before drowning, the charioteer cursed the house of Pelops, and misfortunes fell on the sons of Pelops, Atreus and Thyestes. The Peloponnesus peninsula was named for Pelops.

Pelops

 

in Greek mythology, a hero and the eponym of the Peloponnesus.

Pelops was the son of Tantalus, ruler of Asia Minor. Tantalus invited the gods to a banquet and served them the flesh of Pelops, whom he had killed. The angered gods, refusing the meal, ordered Hermes to restore Pelops to life by plunging the dismembered parts of his body into a cauldron of boiling water. The youth emerged endowed with extraordinary beauty.

Pelops won the hand of Hippodamia, the daughter of the king of Pisa in Elis, in a chariot race. He inherited authority over Elis and extended it to all of southern Greece, which was given the name of Peloponnesus, or the island of Pelops. Ancient tradition links the introduction of the Olympic Games with the name of Pelops: the sanctuaries of Pelops and Hippodamia were located in Olympia.

Pelops

cut up and served as meal to gods. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 817]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pindar as innovator: Poseidon Hippios and the relevance of the Pelops story in Olympian 1.
In "On a Bas-relief of Pelops and Hippodameia," the force of art shapes the forms of the couple through the joint work of the sculptor and the sea.
Tantalus served his son Pelops to the gods for a meal and was punished by being unable to grasp the grapes he continually reaches for in Hades.
He also tried to trick the Olympian gods by serving them the boiled-up pieces of his son, Pelops.
The enigmatic 'Building P', the 'ship-shaped' structure within the Prytaneion, belongs to the eighth century BC; the mound supposed to mark the burial of Pelops goes back further still, to the Early Bronze Age or 'Early Helladic II'.
As a punishment for serving his son Pelops for supper, he was immersed in water and then made to stand in front of a tree with fruit.
Iulio [Pel]ope Salaputi(o) 'Caius Julius Pelops Salaputium'.
The most common surrounds hero Pelops who was a prince from Lydia in Asia Minor who sought the hand of Hippodamia, the daughter of King Oinomaos of Pisa.
Xanthos an immortal horse in Greek myth who drew the chariot given by Poseidon to Pelops.
How the Peloponnese got its name: The area is named after Pelops who had a bit of a setback in his childhood when his father, Tantalus, chopped him to pieces and served him up as a feast for the gods.
She, with her snowy left arm held closely against her snowlike breast bore a burning and shining torch, raised somewhat beyond and above her golden head, held the slender stalk-like extremity by the sharp point, and offering adroitly her free arm, more shining white than was that of Pelops, in which appear the delicate veins of the upper arm and the basilic vein, such like those sandalwood lines drawn on the cleanest papyrus.
63) Such a primal evil that explains subsequent evils is a factor common to foundation myths such as the story of Cain and Abel, Romulus and Remus, or Tantalus' cooking of Pelops.