Peltier effect


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Related to Peltier effect: Seebeck effect, Thomson effect

Peltier effect

(pĕl`tyā): see thermoelectricitythermoelectricity,
direct conversion of heat into electric energy, or vice versa. The term is generally restricted to the irreversible conversion of electricity into heat described by the English physicist James P.
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Peltier effect

A phenomenon discovered in 1834 by J. C. A. Peltier, who found that at the junction of two dissimilar metals carrying a small current the temperature rises or falls, depending upon the direction of the current. In view of experiments, which establish that the rate of intake or output of heat is proportional to the magnitude of the current, it can be shown that an electromotive force resides at a junction. Electromotive forces of this type are called Peltier emf's. See Seebeck effect, Thermoelectricity, Thomson effect

Peltier Effect

 

an evolution or absorption of heat when an electric current flows through a contact, or junction, between two dissimilar conductors. Heat is evolved when the current passes in one direction across the junction and absorbed when the current passes in the other direction. The effect was discovered by J. Peltier in 1834.

The rate Q of heat liberation or absorption is proportional to the magnitude of the current I flowing across the junction: Q = ΠI. The Peltier coefficient Π = – TΔα, where T is the absolute temperature in °K and Δα is the difference between the thermoelectric coefficients of the conductors. Theoretical concepts permit the Peltier coefficient to be formulated in terms of the microscopic characteristics of conduction electrons. The effect is particularly large for semiconductors, a fact made use of in the design of semiconductor cooling and heating devices.

Peltier effect

[pel′tyā i‚fekt]
(physics)
The phenomenon in which heat is evolved or absorbed at the junction of two dissimilar metals carrying a small current, depending upon the direction of the current.
References in periodicals archive ?
00 J Flipse, FL Direct observation of the Bakker, A spin-dependent Peltier effect Slachter, FK Dejene.
The Peltier effect is bidirectional, so a TEC can provide both heating and cooling if needed.
The Peltier effect is the principle at work behind thermoelectric modules (also called Peltier coolers) or refrigerators that are used for transferring heat from one side of the device to the other.
Previous attempts to harness the Peltier effect for home cooling have involved the use of bulky components such as photovoltaic panels.
The secret is Peltier Effect electronics--whatever that is--which allows you to chill items to 42[degrees]F by selecting the "cold" setting or keep them at 140[degrees]F by switching to "hot.
The solid-state devices operate as an application of the Peltier effect, in which a low voltage DC source is applied to a thermoelectric module to produce the movement of heat from one side to another.
The compact, quiet thermoelectric chiller models provide temperature control by utilizing the Peltier Effect.
This process, known as the Peltier effect, is associated with increased heat below ground.
The commonly employed "Spanner" psychrometer measures this evaporative cooling after water has first been condensed on the thermocouple junction via the Peltier effect (Spanner, 1951).
Complete real-time PCR system, which includes the device with interchangeable thermal block format 96-well plate based on the Peltier effect, allowing maximum temperature homogeneity and rapid cycling, with the possibility of launching its own separate management PC and compatible with all popular brands Fluorescent, personal computer Monitor, software equipment for the collection, analysis and visualization of data obtained during the operation, the software package applications: HRM high resolution melting analysis, absolute quantification of parallel analysis of standard calibration curves, SNP genotyping.
TECs (thermoelectric coolers) are solid state heat pumps that operate using the Peltier effect.
Several solid-state cooling phenomena are the subject of active research including the Peltier effect, electron tunneling, the magnetocaloric effect, the electrocaloric effect, and the thermoelastic effect.