Pelym


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pelym

 

(Bol’shoi Pelym), a river in Sverdlovsk Oblast, RSFSR, a left tributary of the Tavda River (Ob’ River basin). The Pelym is 707 km long and drains an area of 15,200 sq km. It rises on the eastern slopes of the northern Urals and flows through the Ural foothills and then across the Western Siberian Lowland. In its lower course it flows through Lake Pelym Tuman. It is fed primarily by snow. The mean flow rate is approximately 100 cu m per sec. The Pelym freezes in October, and the ice breaks up in April. It is used for floating timber and is navigable to the settlement of Portakh, 245 km from the mouth.


Pelym

 

a Mansi tribal union that existed from the mid-15th to late 16th centuries, until unification with the Russian state. It comprised the tribes along the Pelym, Sos’va, and Loz’va rivers and included the Mansi tribal unions along the Konda and Tavda rivers (Konda and Tabary principalities). Russian sources referred to the union as the Pelym State or Pelym Principality. It was headed by a clan aristocracy of princelings.

REFERENCE

Boiarshinova, Z. Ia. Naselenie Zapadnoi Sibiri do nachala russkoi kolonizatsii. Tomsk, 1960.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the next three chapters, Puzanov examines the Tobol'sk garrison, which included the Pelym, Surgut, Berezov, Tiumen', Verkhotur'e, Turinsk, and Tara district forts.
Dmitrii Redin's Administrativnye struktury i biurokratiia Urala v epokhu petrovskikh reform is longer than Pisar'kova's text (minus her tables), but more tightly focused on the course of the Petrine administrative reforms in the Urals region (the western part of the governorship of Siberia, which was capitaled at Tobol'sk and included Tiumen', Turinsk, Pelym', Verkhotur'e, Kungur, Solikamsk, Cherdyn', Kaigorodok, and Viatka).