Peng Dehuai


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Peng Dehuai

or

P'eng Teh-huai

(both: pŭng` dŭ`hwī`), 1898–1974, Communist Chinese general and political leader. He held various command positions in the Red Army, and in 1934–35 he joined with Mao ZedongMao Zedong
or Mao Tse-tung
, 1893–1976, founder of the People's Republic of China. Mao was one of the most prominent Communist theoreticians and his ideas on revolutionary struggle and guerrilla warfare have been extremely influential, especially among Third
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Zhu DeZhu De
or Chu Teh
, 1886–1976, Chinese Communist soldier and leader. He was graduated (1911) from the Yunnan military academy and served in various positions with armies loyal to Sun Yat-sen. Stationed in Sichuan prov., he was a warlord from 1916 to 1920.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in the long marchlong march,
Chin., Changzheng, the journey of c.6,000 mi (9,660 km) undertaken by the Red Army of China in 1934–35. When their Jiangxi prov. Soviet base was encircled by the Nationalist army of Chiang Kai-shek, some 90,000 men and women broke through the siege (Oct.
..... Click the link for more information.
. He became well known as the originator, with Mao, of the tactics of guerrilla warfare. In the Korean War Peng commanded the Chinese Communist troops. He was minister of defense from 1954 to 1959, when, after criticizing the Great Leap ForwardGreat Leap Forward,
1957–60, Chinese economic plan aimed at revitalizing all sectors of the economy. Initiated by Mao Zedong, the plan emphasized decentralized, labor-intensive industrialization, typified by the construction of thousands of backyard steel furnaces in place
..... Click the link for more information.
, he was replaced by Lin BiaoLin Biao
or Lin Piao
, 1908–71, Chinese Communist general and political leader. Lin was trained at Whampoa Academy, and during the Northern Expedition he rose to company commander in the Kuomintang army.
..... Click the link for more information.
. He served (1959–65) as vice premier. Peng's rivalry with Mao made him an early target of the cultural revolution, and in 1967 he disappeared from public view after being arrested and losing his governmental posts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nam Il, as well as the commander of the Chinese People's Volunteers, Peng Dehuai.
A telegram was sent that day to People's Liberation Army (PLA) Commander Peng Dehuai, to the party Central Committee, and to "every unit to alert them and require timely reports of any similar situations.
It's very serious," said Zhang Ming, an expert on domestic politics at Beijing's Renmin University, noting that the fall from grace of earlier prominent military leaders like Lin Biao and Peng Dehuai were not related to corruption issues.
Defence minister Peng Dehuai is seen sharing a laugh with Lieutenant General JN Chaudhary.
Commanded by Chinese General Peng Dehuai, these forces made contact but then withdrew, leaving the West to ponder the significance of the appearance of Chinese on the battlefield.
The commander, Peng Dehuai, a veteran of the Eighth Route Army that had fought the Japanese and the Nationalist forces of Chiang Kai-shek, was among the PLA's most respected commanders.
When in 1959 Peng Dehuai, an officer in the Chinese army, wrote a letter to Chairman Mao about the famine, Mao dismissed Peng from the army.
Chinese General Peng Dehuai bitterly observed that had the communists controlled the skies during these earlier offensives, "the American and British invaders would already have been eliminated in Korea.
The Great Leap Forward, the purge of Peng Dehuai, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen incident are all interpreted in terms of the party usurping the state's authority.
10) After Lushan, Mao sought to revive the collapsing Great Leap and pressed for a purge of those alleged to have joined Peng Dehuai in an "anti-party conspiracy" characterized by "right opportunism.
On November 18 Mao cabled Peng Dehuai, commander-in-chief of the Chinese People's Volunteers (CPV): "The US, Britain and France couldn't do anything to us.
Most of these accounts are based on Millett's personal interviews, but a few, including the chapters on General Peng Dehuai (commander of the Communist Chinese People's Volunteers Army [CPVA] in Korea), on the North Korean and CPVA soldiers, and on the Russian pilots, are based on memoirs and other sources.