Penitence


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Penitence

Act of Contrition
prayer of atonement said after making one’s confession. [Christianity: Misc.]
Agnes, Sister
former Lady Laurentini; a penitent nun. [Br. Lit.: The Mysteries of Udolpho, Freeman, 4]
Ancient Mariner
telling his tale is penance for his guilt. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”]
Canossa
site of Henry IV’s submission to Pope Gregory VII (1077). [Eur. Hist.: Grun, 140]
Dimmesdale, Arthur
Puritan minister publicly atones for sin of adultery. [Am. Lit.: The Scarlet Letter]
Dismas (Dysmas)
in the Apocryphal gospels, the penitent thief. [Christianity: Benét, 274]
Elul
sixth month of Jewish year; month of repentance. [Judaism: Wigoder, 174]
Flagellants
groups of Christians who practised public flagellation as penance. [Christian Hist.: NCE, 959]
Henry IV (1050–1106)
Holy Roman Emperor who begged forgiveness from the Pope at Canossa. [Eur. Hist.: Benét, 456]
Julian, St., the Hospitaler
for having mistakenly killed his parents, atones by becoming a beggar and helping the wretched. [Christ. Leg.: Attwater]
Mary Magdalene
abjectly cleans Jesus’s feet with tears; dries them with her hair. [N.T.: Luke 7:37–50]
Nineveh
townspeople repented for wickedness by fasting and donning sackcloth. [O.T.: Jonah 3:5–10]
Pelagius the Repentant, St.
dancing-girl converts to solitary, saintly ways. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 272]
penance
Catholic sacrament, whereby the penitent is absolved of sins by the confessor. [Christianity: NCE, 2096]
sable
black fur represents repentance. [Heraldry: Halberts, 37]
sackcloth and ashes
traditional garb of contrition. [O.T.: Jonah 3:6; Esther 4:1–3; N.T.: Matthew 11:21]
scapegoat
sent into wilderness bearing sins of Israelites. [O.T.: Leviticus 16:8–22]
Scarlet Sister Mary
seeks divine forgiveness in night of wild prayer. [Am. Lit.: Scarlet Sister Mary]
skull
always present in pictures of Mary Magdalene repenting. [Christian Art: de Bles, 29]
Tannhäuser
seeking salvation, takes pilgrimage to Rome. [Ger. Opera: Wagner, Tannhauser, Westerman, 211]
Tenorio, Don Juan
after sinful lifetime, eleventh-hour repentance saves his soul. [Span. Lit.: Don Juan Tenorio]
Theodosius (346–395) Roman Emperor;
did public penance before St. Ambrose. [Rom. Hist.: EB, 18:272–273]
Twelve Labors of Hercules
undertaken as penance for slaying his children. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Hall, 148]
violet
Christian liturgical color; worn during Lent and Advent. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]
Yom Kippur
most sacred Hebrew holy day; the day of atonement. [Judaism: NCE, 182]
References in classic literature ?
As for the moral turpitude that man unveiled to me, even with tears of penitence, I can not, even in memory, dwell on it without a start of horror.
But it was less from terror than from regret that he now suffered; and with his regret there were mingled cutting pangs of penitence.
Of course, a minute or so later I would realise wrathfully that it was all a lie, a revolting lie, an affected lie, that is, all this penitence, this emotion, these vows of reform.
replied Mordaunt, in a tone of deep despair, "my penitence is sincere.
For Dinah had that belief in visible manifestations of Jesus, which is common among the Methodists, and she communicated it irresistibly to her hearers: she made them feel that he was among them bodily, and might at any moment show himself to them in some way that would strike anguish and penitence into their hearts.
Humility and penitence are the seals of Christianity; and, without feeling them deeply seated in the soul, all hope is delusive, and leads to vain expectations.
But, my lord, if there be no secret of penitence, will the director consent to my being here?
I grow angry and I curse them, and they feign penitence, but behind my back I know they call me a toothless old ape.
The spirits are pointing the way to penitence, and urging the thief to restitution.
It happened nearly twenty years before, when he was chaplain to his co-religionists in a prison in Chicago--where the Irish population displayed a capacity both for crime and penitence which kept him tolerably busy.
It MAY be a very good sort of penitence in a vagabond, who has wasted the best time of his life, to go back then to decent people that he never was a credit to and live upon them, but it's not my sort.
Each young and ardent person writes a diary, in which, when the hours of prayer and penitence arrive, he inscribes his soul.