Pennsylvanian


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Pennsylvanian

1. of the state of Pennsylvania
2. (in North America) of, denoting, or formed in the upper of two divisions of the Carboniferous period (see also Mississippian (sense 2)), which lasted 30 million years, during which coal measures were formed
3. an inhabitant or native of the state of Pennsylvania
4. the. the Pennsylvanian period or rock system, equivalent to the Upper Carboniferous of Europe

Pennsylvanian

[¦pen·sal¦vā·nyən]
(geology)
A division of late Paleozoic geologic time, extending from 320 to 280 million years ago, varyingly considered to rank as an independent period or as an epoch of the Carboniferous period; named for outcrops of coal-bearing rock formations in Pennsylvania.
References in periodicals archive ?
Upon completion, the company tested a zone in a Pennsylvanian age interval as well as another zone in a Permian age interval.
I don't expect the Daily Pennsylvanian to be liberal enough to print this letter, so may send a copy to the Pyongyang Herald
Hillary, naturally, now indicates that she adores guns and is striving to convince Pennsylvanians that they should be outraged by the "elitist" remarks.
Tree ferns evolved in latest Mississippian times and remained rare during the Early Pennsylvanian (DiMichele and Phillips 2002).
While Specter was busy seeking to clarify his storm-creating post-election remarks, the interim president of ardently pro-abortion NARAL Pro-Choice America defended the Pennsylvanian.
The Raccoon Creek Group in the Illinois Basin contains the oldest rocks of the Pennsylvanian System that range in age from Morrowan to Desmoinesian.
While collecting marine invertebrate fossils from Upper Pennsylvanian deposits near Jacksboro, Jack County, Texas, one of us (P.
Around 315 million years ago, during the Pennsylvanian period of Earth's history, these regions formed the tropical belt of a huge supercontinent that straddled the equator.
This is just the opposite of what scientists had thought was the last major movement during the Pennsylvanian period some 300 million years ago, in which the Wichita Mountains to the south were uplifted, causing land north of the fault to sink.
It is essential that we ensure that every Pennsylvanian has a warm home and I encourage anyone who needs this assistance to apply for the program that provides hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanias families with a warm place to live throughout the winter.
A more robust, comprehensive, and fair drilling tax would provide enough money to protect our environment, now and in the future, and would mean every Pennsylvanian would benefit from the use of our shared resources.

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