Pentecostal

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Related to Pentecostalists: Pentecostal Church

Pentecostal

1. of or relating to any of various Christian groups that emphasize the charismatic aspects of Christianity and adopt a fundamental attitude to the Bible
2. of or relating to Pentecost or the influence of the Holy Ghost
3. a member of a Pentecostal Church
http://pentecostalevangel.ag.org/
http://www.oru.edu/university/library/holyspirit/pentorg1.html
http://www.upci.org/
http://www.paoc.org/
http://www.iphc.org/
http://www.pentecostalworldconf.org/
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentecostal
References in periodicals archive ?
Such choruses are sung by both Anglicans and Pentecostalists in Erub, at their separate services and also at combined fellowship meetings.
Because the Pentecostalists disapprove of secular dance, `action choruses' have become their substitutes for dance; members of the Anglican Church maintain the choreography and performance of ailan dans.
In 1997, there was a split in the Full Gospel Church, resulting in the majority of Pentecostalists in Erub forming their own branch of the Torres Strait United Pentecostal Outreach.
More recently, the Pentecostalist sects have also had a bearing upon Islander music performances, especially through the prohibition of the performance of secular dances and the encouragement of the singing of modern evangelical songs with English texts.
They also include the 7,000-strong Baptists, active in Poland since the mid-nineteenth century; the Mariavite Church, founded in 1887, which split in 1935; the Polish-Catholic Church, set up around 1900; the Methodists, present since 1921; and the 12,000-member Pentecostalist movement, which suffered severely under communist rule and now has 117 congregations.
The link between the political and the religious movement did not take place immediately, but since 1977 Indian Pentecostalists have actively participated in occupying lands.
This demand explains the attitude of Pentecostalists to Pinochet's regime, which gave them the hope of being transformed in turn into an official church, or their support for Rios Montt in Guatemala, who gave them greater recognition by the state than they had ever previously enjoyed.
The election of the Pentecostalist Serrano Elias as president of Guatemala in 1991, of a Baptist vice-president in Peru in 1990, as well as the success of the Pentecostal candidate who finished third in the presidential elections in Nicaragua in October 1996, could not go unnoticed.
That is why, inscribed in the dual structure of Latin American political systems, the Pentecostalist masses, in continuity with the indigenous symbolic universe, tend to develop a client or subordinate relationship with the neo-corporatist state.
Indeed, a couplet from a Wesley hymn, quoted by a Pentecostalist from Singapore, looks set to become a Santiago soundbite:
Second, the AICs are not generally recognized as genuinely Pentecostalist by member churches of the PWC.