Penthesilea


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Penthesilea

(pĕn'thĕsəlē`ə), in Greek mythology, an Amazon queen. In the Trojan War, she led a troop of Amazons against the Greeks. She was killed by Achilles, who then fell in love with her dead body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The author first dedicates his pamphlet to Julius Caesar in the hopes that Caesar--the great architect of civilization, nation building, and expansion--can defend the writing "from the biting lawes of snatching carpers" The queen's presence is then directly connected to Troy and Penthesilea, for Aske describes her as "nought vnlike the Amazonian Queene, / .
Penthesilea, queen of the Amazons, slain by Achilles; Pentheus, the unfortunate son of Agave who resisted the new cult of Dionysus and was torn to pieces by bacchant women among whom was his mother--the plot of Euripides' Bacchae.
6 above (1998); on the Achilles and Penthesilea, see Smith, op.
After returning from my journey with Penthesilea, I read of Adolphe Appia's struggles and his pronouncements, as close to me as they were far away.
The other classical entry in You, Emperors, and Others is "Fatal Interview: Penthesilea and Achilles.
Part of the lost epic Aithiopis, for example, described how Achilles killed the Amazon queen Penthesilea and the Ethiopian prince Memnon.
Brendan Duke, trainer of Penthesilea Eile "We're looking to get a bit of black type, but it looks a very difficult task when you compare this race to the last two years when it attracted just five runners each time.
com Handicap, following a creditable fifth to Penthesilea Eile (a winner again since).
Brodsky, "Kant and Narrative Theory," The Imposition of Form (Princeton: Princeton UP, 1987) 21-87; and Michael Shae, "Fatal Vision: Penthesilea and the Kantian Sublime," Dramas of Sublimity and Sublimities of Drama, diss.
The two women knights in Orlando Furioso have a second important pedigree; they descend from a long line of classical ancestors, starting with amazons and other warriors like Harpalyce, Penthesilea, and, of course, Camilla from Book XI of the Aeneid.
Secular, if not historical, too, is Ursula Schulze's study of the figure of Camilla in Virgil, in French and in Veldeke, comparing this with presentations of Penthesilea and pointing on to Wolfram and Willehalm.
Noel Meade's mare stayed on strongly to win by four and a half lengths from Penthesilea Eile at 16-1.