Pentheus


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Pentheus

(pĕn`thēəs), in Greek mythology, king of Thebes, son of Cadmus' daughter Agave. When Dionysus came to Thebes, Pentheus denied his divinity and tried to prevent his ecstatic rites. The women of Thebes, led by Agave, were driven mad by the offended god and tore Pentheus to pieces. The story is the subject of Euripides' Bacchae.
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pentheus females began oviposition 1-2 days after emergence and continued up to day 40 and the post-oviposition period was longer than C.
Failure to do so is, after all, what got Pentheus killed.
Interestingly, in the Choral ode which follows this interaction, the Chorus of Dionysus' followers ask Pentheus on behalf of Dionysus, 'Why do you renounce me?
The blind philosopher Tiresias, then, is trying to move Pentheus past his figuratively blind insistence on figures, on holding to the semblance of things.
The action centres on his battle with Pentheus (Bertie Carvel, excellent), who refuses to believe Dionysos is a god, with grisly consequences.
Paschalis then elaborates on the connections between Nonnus' Actaeon and Pentheus, focusing on the importance Nonnus' poikilon eidos has for these two characters.
Ovid, of course, takes this theme up again at the end of Metamorphoses 3, in the story of Pentheus and Bacchus; see Janan 2009, 63-4.
As King Pentheus discovered, to try and suppress them is entirely suicidal.
The passage from Metamorphoses tells how King Pentheus sought to rid his kingdom of worshipers of Bacchus, and is torn limb from limb and his head torn off by Bacchants, including his mother and sisters in a divinely-induced trance.
Next there is a famous dialogue between Pentheus and Dionysos in which Dionysos, still in disguise, cunningly transforms the excited hostility of Pentheus to a docile agreement with him.