Pepi II

Pepi II

(pā`pē), d. c.2185 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the VI dynasty. His reign (c.2275–c.2185 B.C.) is the longest recorded in history. It was successful because the powerful southern lords at Elephantine organized the Egyptian caravan trade route, which enabled expeditions to penetrate well into Nubia and carry on a prosperous trade with Sudan and Punt as well as with Byblos in Phoenicia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, Pepi II, King of Egypt, comes top of the list one the world's longest rulers from circa 2566-2476 BC - 90 years.
It overthrew the rule of King Pepi II, who ruled the country for a very long time, some even say into his 90's, with documents usually describing him as an ageing King secluded in his palace and disconnected from the outside world.
Sherif Abdel-Megid, a writer who works for Egyptian television, boasts that Egypt's revolution and the explosion of popular art that followed it finds its roots in the decay of the Sixth dynasty in Egypt's Old Kingdom, following the reign of Pepi II (2278-2184 BC), credited with having the longest reign of any monarch in history at 94 years (Mubarak, eat your heart out).
For example, Pepi II, the third king of the 6th Dynasty, moved further to the southwest, and aligned the top of his pyramid with that of 3rd Dynasty King Sekhemkhet.
However, it is still unclear if this queen was the wife of Pepi I or Pepi II, who ruled during the 6th Dynasty.
He translates the texts found in the pyramids of Unis, Teti (partial), Pepi I, Merenre (partial), Pepi II, and Neith, presenting each corpus in the order that current research indicates it was meant to be read.
We still do not know if she was the wife of Pepi I (2354-2310 BC) or of Pepi II (2300-2206 BC)," Hawass said.
According to Philippe Collombert who headed the French team, she was "probably" the wife of Pepi II.
Badly destroyed, the 33-by 16-foot burial chamber belonged to Queen Behenu, wife of either King Pepi I or Pepi II of the Sixth Dynasty.
The present volume focuses on tombs 66 and 73, which belonged to Idu Seneni and his father, Thauty, two nomarchs of the seventh Upper Egyptian nome during the reign of Pepi II.