Pequod


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Pequod

ship in which Captain Ahab pursued the great white whale. [Am. Lit.: Melville Moby Dick]
See: Quest
References in periodicals archive ?
In the entryway to the Spouter-Inn in New Bedford, Massachusetts, as Ishmael waits to board the Pequod, his eyes settle on a large painting.
But Starbuck cannot bring himself to shoot Ahab when he has the chance, even to save the Pequod and all thirty members of the crew.
Koestler may, in that regard, have come to judge Communism much as he surveyed the closed-system politics of Ahab's Pequod, since "It is a basic rule of Communist discipline that, once the Party has decided to adopt a certain line regarding a given problem, all criticism of that decision becomes deviationist sabotage." Demanding "complete unanimity of opinion" (22), Communism, for a retrospective Koestler, embodies the disease of "absolutitis" (Koestler, Arrow 216), afflicting its political leaders and rendering their followers servile.
And so did Ishmael seek more than the 300th lay on his maiden whaling journey on the Pequod (which, incidentally, the Starbucks founders also considered for the shop's name).
On the night before they are to leave, a family friend tells Ishmael that the Earth is going to be out of resources before his years indenture is up, and that they have met before, many years before, when Ben was a boy and Ishmael served on the Pequod on Cretacea.
Playwright Terrance McNally, who initially proposed the subject to Heggie but did not continue with the opera, hit upon an ideal solution for adapting the novel to the stage: setting the opera entirely at sea, aboard the whaling ship Pequod. Heggie and librettist Gene Scheer had the additional idea of placing the novel's famous first line--"Call me Ishmael"--as the opera's last, therefore situating it as a kind of precursor to the events of the novel and providing them with the freedom to condense and adapt the story as needed.
The drawing, a mere thirty-seven feet wide, set the American seat of government shining ominously against a dark charcoal sky; and the slab, seventeen feet high and set at an angle such that it seemed to be sinking into the floor, was called Untitled (The Pequod), 2014, the Pequod, of course, being the ship that Herman Melville made his doomed symbol of the republic in Moby-Dick.
With names such as Ophidian, Vespasian and Pequod, they set the stage for understanding a certain type of striving.
James in order to ask us to see all of these complex and fascinating readings as, well, not so complex and fascinating after all, but all examples of crewmen on the Pequod, subject to their U.S.
Drawing on Alex Woloch's work on minor characters, the chapter explores James's engagement with Melville concerning both individual representation and 'federation' (that is, how to tell the story of the crew aboard the Pequod; p.
The final two pamphlets move a bit further afield: one 1610 text examines the Swedish-Polish war fought in Russia, and the last, from 1637, treats the war between colonists in New England and the Pequod nation.
In that latter sense, he may distort the reality of the story, because the characters in the narrative and especially the crew of the Pequod, described by D.