per capita income

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per capita income

the income per head of the population of a country. This is a usual way of distinguishing between the relative WEALTH of countries, although there exist many problems in using it. Not least of the problems is the continued existence of ‘subsistence’ economic activity and a widespread INFORMAL ECONOMY in many societies. This means that much economic activity goes unrecorded. A further difficulty is that exchange rates (the basis of per capita calculations of differences in income) between different currencies often fail to reflect internal differences in the purchasing power of different currencies. Thus, while useful in establishing broad differences between nations, the notion of per capital income should be used with caution in making more detailed comparisons.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Per-capita income in Bangladesh was estimated at US$1466 in the fiscal year 2015-16, an over threefold rise since the 2014.
By contrast, nations in the southeast quadrant, the bad quadrant, would have had higher per-capita incomes in 1990 than the United States did in 1900 but lower current enrollment rates than the United States had in 1900.
Although no reliable data on the North Korean economy are available, it is generally thought that per-capita income in the North is about one-10th of that of the South.
In Pakistan four studies [UNECAFE (1967); Soligo (1967); Porter (1961) and Khan (1974)], using four different time periods, show divergent results on the relationship between velocity and per-capita income. However it is obvious that these results may be affected by the patterns of development; the changing economic and institutional factors; the time period covered; and the combined data set of East and West Pakistan which was affected by the extreme values.
AS Filipinos' per-capita incomes grow, so will the country's interest payments.
This is in part because some island nations are relatively well off: Singapore and Aruba, for instance, each boast per-capita incomes of US$28,000, values that in Quarless's opinion, are skewed high by the wealth of a minority.
Annual per-capita income exceeded 10,000 dollars before the nation was forced to receive the IMF bailout to keep it from going bankrupt in late 1997.
Most (but not all) of their per-capita income disadvantage can be explained by immigrant status.
The country's gross national income (GNI) per-capita income is at $3,550 in 2015.
Multnomah County, which includes the city of Portland, had a per-capita income of 107 percent of the national average in 1969 and 109 percent in 2004, the most recent year for which the employment department has statistics.
Bureau of Economic Analysis recently completed a survey of per-capita incomes in 366 metropolitan areas across the nation.
Census Bureau statistics show that Oregon began the 1980s with per-capita incomes of $16,074, slightly higher than the national average of $15,523 (expressed in inflation-adjusted 1999 dollars).