Peregrine

(redirected from Peregrine Falcons)
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Peregrine

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A peregrine (foreign) planet is one so situated as to be neither dignified nor exalted, and simultaneously not in aspect with any other planet. A planet so situated in a natal chart indicates a part of the psyche that seems to operate independently from the rest of the native’s personality, and that the native must therefore make a special effort to integrate. The term is seldom used today, except in horary astrology.

References in periodicals archive ?
The raptor was identified as a peregrine falcon by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds charity.
A family of peregrine falcons are living atop the grade II*-listed leadshot tower in Boughton - the tallest structure in Chester at 168ft tall - as they have for several years.
"Peregrine falcons are slowly making a return to the Greater Manchester area and are a fantastic bird to see.
Peregrine falcons are the world's fastest bird and can dive at a speed faster than 200mph.
Peregrine falcons are the world's fastest bird and can dive at a speed faster than 200mph, The birds nearly became extinct in the 1960s after their existence was threatened by pesticides, but laws controlling use of the chemicals meant their numbers slowly recovered.
A spokesman for theRSPBadded: "Peregrine falcons were driven to near extinction in the UK in the 1960s, but as populations recover they are becoming more common in urban areas.
Both Fort Dunlop at Castle Bromwich and the 500ft high BT Tower in the city centre are home to peregrine falcons.
Certain falcon species are becoming rarer, most significantly the saker and peregrine falcons, which are largely used in falconry.
Peregrine falcons may have a fearsome reputation for speed, but for a brief period were nearly extinct in the UK.
Sightings of peregrine falcons in central Texas during any season are uncommon while midsummer sightings are considered highly unusual.
And that's exactly what scientists have given us with a new study on Chicago's faithful peregrine falcons.