Perelandra


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Perelandra

used of the planet Venus, where life has been newly created and the atmosphere has the innocent beauty of Eden. [Eng. Lit.: Lewis Perelandra; The Space Trilogy in Weiss, 437]
See: Utopia
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Lewis conveyed something of this in Perelandra (1943), later prosaically renamed Voyage to Venus, the most daring and poetic novel in his science fiction trilogy.
Lewis takes up that imaginative challenge in his own criticism and fiction by commenting on and critiquing Milton's version in A Preface to Paradise Lost (1942) and presenting his own different versions of the Fall myth in Perelandra (1943) and The Magician's Nephew (1955).
Lewis's Out of the Silent Planet (1938) makes the bibliography, but not the rest of his Space Trilogy: Perelandra (1943) and That Hideous Strength (1945), nor his story collection The Dark Tower (1977), nor his essays Of This and Other Worlds (1982).
Lewis's representations of angellike beings, eldila, in his Cosmic Trilogy, and a passage from the second book in the series, Perelandra, illuminates what Wilbur is doing.
Synopsis: The fictional lands of Narnia and Perelandra are places of wonder and longing.
Lewis demonstrated his capacity for setting forth the faith by means of popular fiction, as well, writing his Narnia books and "Space Trilogy" (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength) as further outlets for discussing the faith by means of allegory.
Lewis includes a similar combination of mysteries in Perelandra, a later novel he carefully prefaces with, "All the human characters in this book are purely fictitious and none of them is allegorical," so that none of his readers mistake the protagonist, Ransom, for, say, Jesus.
Kehl also presents a consideration of Perelandra and The Marble Faun as "grappl[ing] with ...
During the war years Lewis wrote a science fiction trilogy, Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength.
In Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength, these daimones are called eldils and include "Oyarsa," an angelic heavenly servant who assists the protagonist, Ransom, and is described by Ransom in Platonic terms ("Medieval Platonists were right to call angels Oyarsa" [OSP 153]).
will discuss the first half of Lewis' "Perelandra'' at the 9 a.m.
Her real name is Perelandra Beedles and she is quick to explain why she has re-branded herself into her alter-ego.