Perelandra


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Perelandra

used of the planet Venus, where life has been newly created and the atmosphere has the innocent beauty of Eden. [Eng. Lit.: Lewis Perelandra; The Space Trilogy in Weiss, 437]
See: Utopia
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lewis in chapter 16 of Perelandra, as we stand in awe of what is beyond us we can at the same time also take comfort in our smallness (197).
Lewis's representations of angellike beings, eldila, in his Cosmic Trilogy, and a passage from the second book in the series, Perelandra, illuminates what Wilbur is doing.
Synopsis: The fictional lands of Narnia and Perelandra are places of wonder and longing.
Lewis demonstrated his capacity for setting forth the faith by means of popular fiction, as well, writing his Narnia books and "Space Trilogy" (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength) as further outlets for discussing the faith by means of allegory.
In the 1943 novel Perelandra, we read of a demonic figure that rips open frog-like creatures but leaves them alive to suffer agonies.
Lewis includes a similar combination of mysteries in Perelandra, a later novel he carefully prefaces with, "All the human characters in this book are purely fictitious and none of them is allegorical," so that none of his readers mistake the protagonist, Ransom, for, say, Jesus.
Kehl also presents a consideration of Perelandra and The Marble Faun as "grappl[ing] with .
The second death-like trip takes Ransom to Perelandra (Venus), the unfallen planet, where he encounters the first couple in Paradise, and experiences the temptation of the Green Lady (Eve).
In Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength, these daimones are called eldils and include "Oyarsa," an angelic heavenly servant who assists the protagonist, Ransom, and is described by Ransom in Platonic terms ("Medieval Platonists were right to call angels Oyarsa" [OSP 153]).
Her real name is Perelandra Beedles and she is quick to explain why she has re-branded herself into her alter-ego.
Lewis's Perelandra, Ransom sips juice from a gourd and experiences "a totally new genus of pleasures, something unheard of among men, out of all reckoning, beyond all covenant.
Lewis's Space Trilogy-Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength, some of the best fiction of the century past-especially bears the imprint of Virgil.