perfect square

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perfect square

[′pər·fikt ′skwer]
(mathematics)
A number or polynomial which is the exact square of another number or polynomial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigate and use square roots of perfect square numbers (ACMNA150)
j] + w is a perfect square, for i,j [member of] {1, 2, 3,4}, i [not equal to] j,and Diophantus observed that the mentioned set is a D(256) quadruple.
The perfect squares appear in a diagonal in the multiplication table.
These questions, written in multiple-choice format, are similar to those integrated into the game play and address the concepts of identifying prime numbers, evaluating even and odd expressions, and identifying perfect squares.
Squares Table 64 in Albert Beiler's "Recreations in the Theory of Numbers" (Dover, New York, 1966) lists 30 S-numbers which are perfect squares, including D1, F4 and G2 above.
To find out the cube root of up to 15-digit perfect cubes or the square root of up to 10-digit perfect squares will take me between 15 and 50 seconds, depending on the number of digits involved," said Mr Thomas.
3], whose areas are perfect squares, that is, the triangles such that
After this, the rectangular cross section analysis was divided into two separate analyses: one for perfect squares where both cross-sectional dimensions were exactly the same and the other for boards whose thickness and width were different.
These were shaped and polished into perfect squares and the possessor of a matched set of marble gobs wouldn't have swapped one for all of Liz Taylor's diamonds.
How about, Which even numbers are both perfect squares and perfect cubes?
Small spaces between pieces of Styrofoam often made interesting elements in the final prints, so there was no need to cut the plates into perfect squares or tape them together for symmetrical grids.
For example, in Francesco Pona's treatise of 1622, II Paradiso de' Fiori, he strongly recommends that if there is a choice, then the garden should be arranged in "four perfect squares,"(73) the standard format of the fifteenth-and sixteenth-century gardens.