Perianth


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perianth

the outer part of a flower, consisting of the calyx and corolla

Perianth

 

in the flowers of angiosperms, the modified bracts that surround the stamens and pistils. Simple perianths are composed of bracts of the same color. Tulips, lilies, buckwheat, beets, and goosefoot have simple perianths. Perianths with small, usually green calyxes and larger, variously colored coronas are said to be double. Such perianths characterize wild roses, crowfoot, and bellflowers.


Perianth

 

(1) A covering surrounding the generative organs of angiospermous plants.

(2) A covering surrounding the archegonium of most liverworts.

perianth

[′per·ē‚anth]
(botany)
The calyx and corolla considered together.
References in periodicals archive ?
The the perianth segments are fused towards the bases and free towards the tips, they are 3 mm in width and 2.
Record of Dolichotetranychus vandergooti (Oudemans) (Acarina: Tenuipalpidae), a perianth mite on Coconut.
In contrast, in monosymmetric flowers that have a vertical upright position, monosymmetry is often only expressed in the perianth.
Evolution of perianth and stamen characteristics with respect to floral symmetry in Ranunculales.
In Musaceae, the basal-most member of the order, five of the six perianth members fuse to form a floral tube (Figs.
In species that show wilting of the perianth, an important function of senescence may be to allow remobilization of key metabolites from the senescing organs back into the plant.
The fins (or wings) may be derived from ovary outgrowth, perianth, hypanthium, or bract elaboration.
Perianth part connation: floral parts flee=0; floral parts fused= 1.
palustris have a reduced number of perianth parts and a dimerous gynoecium.
2006) have revealed an adaxially situated third scale in some proximal flowers in spikelets of Hellmuthia, and these are interpreted to be perianth segments and not glumes of reduced florets as in Mapanioideae.
In addition, plants of this family can be easily identified by their lenticels on the trunk and branches, aromatic bark and leaves with peppery taste, simple and alternate-distichous leaves, flowers with fleshy perianth, three sepals (rarely two) and berry fruit containing reniform seeds (Salazar, 20O6).
In contrast to the male flowers, the female perianth is not at all recognizable as tepals, consisting of a thin undivided layer adhering to the ovary (this unusual anatomical feature is very important ecologically as discussed in the "Evolution of Propagules Under Domestication" section, and for classification purposes, as discussed in the "Classification and Nomenclatural Issues" section).