Periglacial Process

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Periglacial Process

 

a term introduced in 1909 by the Polish geographer and soil scientist W. Łoziński to describe a process and associated geological formations typical of a zone that has a severely cold climate and is at the immediate margins of Pleistocene glaciers and ice sheets. Periglacial processes occur because of the repeated freezing and thawing of water in loose and fissured rocks. Recent investigations have shown that the climate of the periglacial zone is not always severe.

Climatic conditions that favor periglacial processes may exist unrelated to glaciation. As a result, these processes—frost cracking and disintegration of rocks, ground heaving, and flow of frozen ground on slopes—are frequently common in areas that have not been subject to continental glaciation, such as Eastern Siberia. Geological formations associated with periglacial processes, such as felsenmeers and altiplanation terraces, are frequently found in these areas as well.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cheng, "A review of the influence of freeze-thaw cycles on soil geotechnical properties," Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, vol.
Hinzman, "Shrinking thermokarst ponds and groundwater dynamics in discontinuous permafrost near Council, Alaska," Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, vol.
Lunardini, "Climatic warming and the degradation of warm permafrost," Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, vol.
Krautblatter, "Quantifying Rock Fatigue and Decreasing Compressive and Tensile Strength after Repeated Freeze-Thaw Cycles," Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, vol.
Terrain parameters and remote sensing in the analysis of permafrost distribution and periglacial processes: Principles and examples from southern Norway.
"The Oriented Lakes of Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula, Western Arctic Coast, Canada: A GIS-Based Analysis." Permafrost and Periglacial Processes 13 (1): 61-70.
The recent retreat of the glaciers is accompanied by an increase of the active periglacial processes which is a dominant phenomenon of the present-day changes of landform patterns stimulated by climate-morphogenetic processes.
van Dijk, "Sublimation as a geomorphic process: a review," Permafrost & Periglacial Processes, vol.
It is unfortunate that there are no chapters dealing with polar, glacial or periglacial processes, which are important given Mars' past and present "polar desert" climate.