Perils of Pauline

Perils of Pauline

cliff-hangers in which Pauline’s life is recurrently in danger. [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 559]
See: Danger
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In the case of Pathe's 1914 American release The Perils of Pauline, the only extant version is a greatly edited French cut which, when compared with the existing newspaper tie-ins, reveals significant differences that call into question the tie-in's status as a lesser art designed to capitalize on the release of a film, instead suggesting that tie-ins can be understood as wholly autonomous art forms in their own right, offering a more complete vision than that contained within the film.
But in 1914 what took them back to the Playhouse week after week was a serial, The Perils of Pauline, billed as "The Eclectic Film Company's Great $25,000 Photo-Play.
This begins a series of events, reminiscent of The Perils of Pauline, which first brings her to a French town up the Mississippi, back to New England and finally to land her in the middle of the French and Indian War.
AFrank Loesser penned it for her 1947 movie The Perils Of Pauline.
Barriers to translational research: The perils of Pauline.
Like the Perils of Pauline, every week a disaster but she always comes back.
High-spirited Pauline has just finished making a film of her life, called The Perils of Pauline, with friend and film-maker Jenny McCabe - the project being helped by Lottery funding.
Hooper affectionately recreates that queasily washed out look that graced the likes of Driller Killer, wedding a series of ingeniously grisly murders (using a variety of handyman's tools as you might surmise from the title) to rather more depth of character than is usual for such fodder and lacing everything with a humorous line in homages that range from Psycho to The Perils of Pauline.
Talk to Her is a soap opera that lies somewhere between telenovela and The Perils of Pauline.
Big screen cliffhangers date back to the silent film era when a serial called The Perils of Pauline had audiences perpetually anxious about the fate of the drama queen in the title.
Tune in next week for the further perils of Pauline.
But in the mid-nineties, after more hairsbreadth rescues than the Perils of Pauline, Ice Capades finally went down for the final time-a victim perhaps of the decline overall of "wholesome, good-for-the-whole-family" entertainment.