periodization

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periodization

any division of prehistorical or historical time into definite eras or periods. Often, but not always, suchperiodizations have a technological basis, e.g. PALAEOLITHIC AND NEOLITHIC AGES.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's time perhaps to rethink the very category of 'Modern' and its derivatives, Medieval and Ancient - time, in other words, to rethink the whole problematic of historical periodisation.
While the potential benefits of this periodisation model have been theorised (Issurin, 2010), only a few studies have shown its relative effectiveness, mainly in endurance athletes (Breil et al.
She frequently crosses periodisation linking medieval and Jacobean concepts and stagecraft.
Linking medieval and early modern within a single study, Calin highlights continuities within the field of Older Scots, in contrast to the more marked periodisation of French scholarship.
In addition, questions of periodisation are tackled as Leitch suggests that the concept of treason provides a fruitful way of reading across the medieval and early modern periods.
Using a common periodisation, Morris suggests that neoliberal effects have undermined self-determination.
At the same time, the disciplinary committee stressed that Eniro, as a consequence of the CEO's actions, was put in a distressing situation and that the error related to a question of periodisation and a relatively limited amount.
Whether or not the relative prominence of these different modalities at different times offers any basis at all for periodisation is a question on which there is no clear agreement amongst scholars, with contributors to the present volume taking quite different and distinct positions.
It is an event that further illustrates and substantiates their 'stance' and that also extends the periodisation of their former work--yet essentially both the 'stance' and 'story' are much the same.
The notion of a 'neoliberal novel' conceives of the relation between its constitutive terms in such a way as to allow us to locate the periodisation of the novel not simply in an external, material determination but in the complex interplay of the formal relations between the market, social, and political structures and culture.
This periodisation continues to affect anarchist debates today where emerging anarchist writers rely on Woodcockian notions of old/new anarchism and perpetuate the idea that anarchism works with deaths, breaks and waves, where every epoch reflects a different character, a different entity, hugely different from the one before.