Peripatetics


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Peripatetics

(pĕr'əpətĕt`ĭks) [Gr.,=walking about; from Aristotle's manner in teaching], the followers of Aristotle. TheophrastusTheophrastus
[Gr.,=divinely speaking], c.372–c.287 B.C., Greek philosopher, Aristotle's successor as head of the Peripatetics. The school flourished under his leadership.
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, friend of Aristotle and cofounder with him of the Peripatetic school of philosophy, succeeded him as its head (323 B.C.) and did much to bring it into favor. Strato of Lampsacus was the next leader of the school. Later Peripatetics were largely occupied in preparing paraphrases, commentaries, and interpretations of the teachings of Aristotle. The first complete edition (c.70 B.C.) in ancient times was arranged by Andronicus of Rhodes. The devotees of the school defended its essential doctrines against the Stoics and others, but some adopted variations, particularly concerning the explanation of nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Friends in Council, the Peripatetics discussed religion, philosophy and history.
These are the issues that relate this movement with Arabic peripatetics, but its proposals and "heretical" acts went further, according to the testimony of Lucas of Tuy.
Aristotle is said to have set a limit to divine providence; and the Peripatetics are said to exclude providence from sublunary affairs (Whittaker 1982:5, 7).
39) The Socratics, Peripatetics, and the later Platonists all took a particular interest in utilizing biographical literature as a way of promoting philosophical doctrines and praising their subjects as persons, not only of historical importance, but also as embodiments of philosophical ideals.
Following an introductory overview of the topic, individual chapters focus on the Raika of India, the Peripatetics of South Asia, the Bhil of central western India, the Tharu of Nepal, the Dom of Northern Pakistan, the peoples and cultures of the Kashmir Himalayas, the Hazara of Central Afghanistan, the Wakhi and Kirghiz of the Pamirian Knot, the Badakshani of Tajikistan, the Lezghi of the Caucasus mountain range, the people of Tibet, and the Minhe Mangghuer of China.
We gave the colleges of Europe wise men like Miguel Servet, precursor to Harvey, philosophers like Sepulveda, one of the leading peripatetics of his time, and the Portuguese Sanches, tutor to Montaigne.
The ancient Greek followers of Aristotle were called the Peripatetics, apparently because their teacher taught philosophy as they walked under the peripatos (covered walk) of the Lyceum, an area just outside of Athens.
Taking a lead from Peter Brown's influential studies on the social functions of the Christian holy man in late antiquity, they argue that Buddhist peripatetics and monastics were analogously well-positioned to serve in mediational roles, their status as "selfless" renunciants--unattached to kin or polities, possessions or passions--rendering them ideal brokers and advisors in the settling of community disputes, and effective as patrons and agents of acculturation in situations where expansionary states were domesticating newly incorporated peoples.
Augustine claims that the debate hinges on whether or not one thinks (as the Peripatetics do) that the passions of the wise person can be shaped by reason.
Visits by various peripatetics could not erase what he saw as the vapid intellectual climate of Egypt, and yearning for Andalusia never seems to have waned completely.
18) Natorp (1888) was motivated for this reason to take passages suggesting an identification of metaphysics with theology to be the work of Platonizing early Peripatetics.
Walter Benjamin, The Spectator (Addison & Steele) 1832, 1:17-18, quoted by Peter I Barta in Bely, Joyce, and Doublin: Peripatetics in the City Novel (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996), 6.