Peripatetics


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Peripatetics

(pĕr'əpətĕt`ĭks) [Gr.,=walking about; from Aristotle's manner in teaching], the followers of Aristotle. TheophrastusTheophrastus
[Gr.,=divinely speaking], c.372–c.287 B.C., Greek philosopher, Aristotle's successor as head of the Peripatetics. The school flourished under his leadership.
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, friend of Aristotle and cofounder with him of the Peripatetic school of philosophy, succeeded him as its head (323 B.C.) and did much to bring it into favor. Strato of Lampsacus was the next leader of the school. Later Peripatetics were largely occupied in preparing paraphrases, commentaries, and interpretations of the teachings of Aristotle. The first complete edition (c.70 B.C.) in ancient times was arranged by Andronicus of Rhodes. The devotees of the school defended its essential doctrines against the Stoics and others, but some adopted variations, particularly concerning the explanation of nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Stoic answer is stretched on the rack of a distinction between potential and actual cognition, such that it is either said to succumb to the same pitfall as the Peripatetic solution of a potential intellect, or does not offer any solution at all.
Rashed and I have thus followed a similar line of thought, and our arguments overlap on numerous occasions, especially with regard to the doctrine of creation articulated in Jam', to the need to trace its origin to the philosophical and theological works of the ninth- and tenth-century Baghdad Peripatetics, and to the putative authorship of Yahya ibn 'Adi.
Ibn Abi Jumhur identifies two main competing systems of thought that aim to explain how divine actions come about: Ash'arite kalam and peripatetic philosophy (falsafa).
As the Peripatetics before Sadra had argued, prime matter is 'infinite' because it is indefinite and ready to take on any form when realized by an actual form.
It is academics, not peripatetics, that talked in terms of mixtures and proportions, and of combination and separation.
This branch of learning had Aristotelian roots and was considered by the Peripatetics as one of the three divisions of "practical philosophy," the other two being ethics and politics.
In each dialogue, moreover, Cicero is concerned not simply with presenting his own views, but rather with critically evaluating those of the Epicureans, Stoics, and Peripatetics. In refuting the Epicureans, Cicero takes a largely Stoic position; responding to the Stoics, he adopts a Peripatetic perspective; and in his brief criticism of the Peripatetics, Cicero again takes up the Stoic viewpoint.
In the heavens this faculty is a mixture of active and passive, as in line CD which can be moved to form this or that angle: consequently, the Peripatetics have many reasons to hold that in the heavens act is mixed with power.
Prantl found Stoic logic too difficult to understand, and dismissed it saying "clearly that Stoic nonsense must rest on an unintelligent copying of some earlier doctrine, which can be no other than that of the Peripatetics" (quoted in translation by B.
Barnes considers the ancient quarrel between the Stoics and Peripatetics such as Alexander of Aphrodisias as to whether logic is a part of philosophy (Stoics) or simply a tool of philosophy (Peripatetics).
Strabo's primary teachers were Peripatetics and thus he was "Aristotelized," though later he became a Stoic.
A first appendix portrays how certain early Peripatetics regarded Aristotle's doctrines as being largely in accord with and a development of Plato's while others offered extended criticisms of Platonic positions, and a second inventories major critical, exegetical works of Aristotle's writings, along with others that correlated both thinkers' positions and principles.