Permanent Court of International Justice


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Permanent Court of International Justice:

see World CourtWorld Court,
popular name of the Permanent Court of International Justice, established pursuant to Article 14 of the Covenant of the League of Nations. The protocol establishing it was adopted by the Assembly of the League in 1920 and ratified by the requisite number of states
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Permanent Court of International Justice

 

an international court established by the League of Nations at The Hague pursuant to article 14 of the covenant of the League and to an agreement of Dec. 16, 1920. The court functioned from 1921 to February 1940 and was officially dissolved in January 1946.

The Permanent Court was established to resolve international disputes by judicial means. It had 11, later 15, judges, elected by the League’s Council and Assembly for terms of nine years. The court had jurisdiction over cases voluntarily submitted by disputing nations, as well as over disputes subject to its review according to treaties and conventions in force.

The Permanent Court also gave advisory opinions on disputes referred to it by the League’s Council and Assembly. The court did not play an important role in resolving international disputes: during its existence it reviewed only 37 disputes and offered 28 advisory opinions. The USSR was not a party to the court’s statute.

References in periodicals archive ?
Meeting of the Advisory Committee of Jurists, supra note 149, at 235 (address by Baron Descamps, President of the Committee); Report of the Informal Inter-Allied Committee on the Future of the Permanent Court of International Justice (Feb.
Hudson, The Succession of the International Court of Justice to the Permanent Court of International Justice, 51 AM.
It is also interesting to observe that several times, the European Court of Human Rights has refused to follow the direction of the Permanent Court of International Justice or of the International Court of Justice, usually in eases containing differences between the important aspects of the affairs.
When the European Court of Human Rights refers proprio motu to the jurisprudence of the Permanent Court of International Justice or to that of the International Court of Justice, it usually follows their direction.
If we examine the tendency of the International Court of Justice to cite the dicta of other international tribunals, we can conclude that the attention of the judges of the World Court is focused mostly on the jurisprudence of the Permanent Court of International Justice and some arbitral awards.
The Permanent Court of International Justice expressed this rule for the first time in the Lotus case (103) and the International Court of Justice has done so as well.
The Permanent Court of International Justice has delivered twenty-seven advisory opinions.
The judgment explains extensively in these paragraphs how the corresponding article of the Statue of the Permanent Court of International Justice was formulated; Fifty lines are devoted to the presentation of the history of this formula and the metamorphosis of the original proposal.
A) at 241, 247 (1970) (preliminary objections) [hereinafter Belgian Linguistic case, preliminary objections] ("[H]aving regard to the decisions of the Permanent Court of International Justice and the International Court of Justice, the Belgian Government contends that the European Court has no jurisdiction to pronounce on the merits of this case .

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