Persephone


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Persephone

(pərsĕf`ənē) or

Proserpine

(prōsûr`pənē), in Greek and Roman religion and mythology, goddess of fertility and queen of the underworld. She was the daughter of Zeus and Demeter. When she was still a beautiful maiden, Pluto seized her and held her captive in his underworld. Though Demeter eventually persuaded the gods to let her daughter return to her, Persephone was required to remain in the underworld for four months because Pluto had tricked her into eating a pomegranate (food of the dead) there. When Persephone left the earth, the flowers withered and the grain died, but when she returned, life blossomed anew. This story, which symbolizes the annual vegetation cycle, was celebrated in the Eleusinian MysteriesEleusinian Mysteries
, principal religious mysteries of ancient Greece. The mysteries may have originated as part of an early agrarian festival peculiar to certain families in Eleusis. The Athenians later (c.600 B.C.) took over the ceremonies.
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, in which Persephone appeared under the name Kore.

Persephone

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Persephone is one of the names given to the hypothetical planet orbiting the Sun beyond Pluto. Peresephone, asteroid 399 (the 399th asteroid to be discovered, on February 23, 1895), is approximately 55 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.3 years. Persephone was named after the daughter of Demeter, who was kidnapped by Hades and taken to the underworld to become his queen. According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Persephone represents “separation anxiety; attitudes toward making transitions (that take one away from familiar people and circumstances); experience of feeling separate from family/others.” This asteroid’s key word is “separation.” J. Lee Lehman notes that the location of Persephone may indicate an area where skills are undeveloped. The less pleasant side of this asteroid is that it may indicate where one is an innocent yet willing victim.

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Lang-Wescott. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Persephone

 

(also Kore), in ancient Greek mythology, the goddess of fertility and the underworld. Persephone was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus and the wife of Hades. The myth of the abduction of Persephone by Hades and her annual return to earth from the underworld reflects a primitive conception of the periodic dying and rebirth of the plant world. Persephone was venerated by the Romans under the name of Proserpina.

Persephone (Roman: Proserpine)

goddess of fertility; often associated with crops. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: NCE, 1637]
See: Farming

Persephone

personification of spring. [Gk. Myth.: Cirlot, 252]
See: Spring

Persephone

the period of her stay (winter) with Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 28]
See: Winter
References in periodicals archive ?
The piquant novel is as alluring as Persephones pomegranates; its protagonist as exceptional as Beutners vision.
At weekends, Rocco, six, insists on joining freelance beauty PR Persephone and her boyfriend Andrew for sit-down meals.
Un diwrnod, mi welodd Pluto Persephone yn crwydro ar ei phen ei hun, a dyma fo yn ei chipio a'i dwyn i lawr i Hades hefo fo.
6) While Persephone was picking up a lily (according to some myths, the lily, or narcissus, was put there by Zeus, as an accomplice of Hades), the ground opened and Hades dragged her down to the Underworld.
After Hades kidnapped Persephone, Demeter, the Goddess who brings nature's bounty, could not help the Earth bloom because she was steeped in sorrow, so to appease the mournful Goddess, Zeus and Hermes brokered a deal wherein Persephone and Demeter can spend part of the year together.
During baseline equilibrium, Persephone lives in a stable situation with her mother, Demeter, the goddess of the harvest.
As Persephone, Cynthia Bueschel Svigas can sing, but her acting needs developing.
persephone are predators and feed on microarthropods.
Operating at the intersection of literary criticism, psychology, and theology, Laurie Brands Gagne analyzes three ancient tales as "women's stories of the underworld" (5): "The Descent of Inanna," the myth of Demeter and Persephone, and the legend of Eros and Psyche.
The first is the story of the descent of the goddess Inanna into the underworld, and the second and third are the better known stories of the rape of Persephone and the tormented love of Cupid and Psyche.
In "Demeter and Persephone," Tennyson's characterization of the goddess gives an account of the loss of her daughter that consists of strands from the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, from Ovid's Fasti and Metamorphoses, and from Claudian's De Raptu Proserpinae, works that originated over a period of roughly a thousand years of classical story-telling.
In John Ehle's "The Winter People," the goddess Persephone is with Hades, and winter is upon the Appalachians in full force.