Parrotia Persica

(redirected from Persian Ironwood)

Parrotia Persica

 

(Russian common name, ironwood), a deciduous tree of the family Hamamelidaceae. It attains a height of 14–25 m. Its trunk sometimes puts forth branches as far as the ground, and the branches often take root and fuse with each other as well as with the branches of neighboring trees, such as hornbeam, zelkova, and maple. The bark is gray, in places reddish brown, and peeling. The leaves are leathery and obovate or elliptical. The blossoms are without petals, and two to five blossoms are gathered in heads at the ends of shortened shoots. The calyx has five to seven lobes, and there are five to seven stamens and a half-inferior ovary. The fruit is a woody bivalvular pod, and blossoms appear prior to leafing. The tree may live as long as 200 years.

The species may be found in relict, broad-leaved forests in Azerbaijan (Talysh) as well as in northern Iran (the southern shore of the Caspian Sea), where it grows in lowlands and mountains (up to 700 m above sea level and sometimes higher), on the banks of rivers and streams, and in ravines with moist or, more rarely, dry, rocky soil. The wood is compact and heavy (with a density of 0.9–1.05 g per cu cm), splits easily, lacks resilience, and is very hard and durable (hence the name); it is rose-colored with a brown tint. The wood is used for making certain machine parts, works of art, and decorative veneer.

Ironwood is also the common name of other plants with hard wood, such as the Musaferrea in India, Ixoraferrea in the Antilles, Caesalpinia ferrea in Brazil, Stadmannia sideroxylon on Mauritius, Argania sideroxylon in Morocco, and several species of the genus Sideroxylon.

REFERENCES

Safarov, I. “Ekologo-biologicheskaia kharakteristika zheleznogo dere va.”Tr. in-ta botaniki AN Azerbaidzhanskoi SSR, 1952, vol. 16.
Derev’ia i kustarniki SSSR vol. 3. Moscow-Leningrad, 1954.

T. G. LEONOVA

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References in periodicals archive ?
For assorted crimson and gold tints on the same tree there is no better than the Persian Ironwood (Parrotia persica).
A smaller tree is the Persian ironwood (parrotia persica), which grows to eight metres and whose leaves turn to a patchwork of orange, bright red and purple-red in autumn, although it needs acid soil for good leaf colour.
For a startling show of red, amber and gold (followed by tiny red flowers during the winter), the Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica) is wonderful.
For anyone seeking a tree that is a little out of the ordinary, Mick has a few suggestions: "There's the Persian Ironwood Parrotia which has fabulous autumn colour.
30am-4pm and you can follow a special family trail around the Old Arboretum to meet the Persian ironwood, known for the range of red, yellow and green leaves it can display all at once.
Plants such as the Persian ironwood, spindles and even some of the maples are already starting to show signs of good autumn colour,' he added.
BEST FOR: Nature lovers: Ynyshir Hall, Machynlleth, Wales On Cardigan Bay, and set in a beautifully landscaped garden, the 17th century former country lodge of Queen Victoria is hidden among giant redwoods, rhododendron and a Persian ironwood which the Queen planted herself.
A smaller tree is the Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica), which grows to 8m and whose leaves turn to a patchwork of orange, bright red and purple-red in autumn, although it needs acid soil for good leaf colour.
And a shrubby tree, Persian ironwood is giving vibrant autumnal colours at least two months early.
Japanese cedars, magnolias, and Persian ironwoods combined to put on a striking autumn show at Belsay, boosted by autumn flowering crocus and November-blooming pink rhododendrons.