Personal Genome Project


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Related to Personal Genome Project: Human Genome Project

Personal Genome Project

An endeavor organized by George Church of Harvard University to sequence the genomes of 100,000 volunteers while recording their personal history. First launched in 2007, the goal of the Personal Genome Project (PGP) is to determine relationships between a person's genetic makeup (genomics), their environment and their physical traits (phenomics). Involved in DNA sequencing since the 1980s, Church's Polonator multiplexing machine sequences genes faster than traditional methods. For more information, visit www.personalgenomes.org. See Human Genome Project.
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(2010) "Personal genomes in progress: from the human genome project to the personal genome project." Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience.
Personal Genome Project (Web) "Participation overview." Available from: http://www.personalgenomes.org/participate.html [accessed June 6, 2012].
(50) See PERSONAL GENOME PROJECT, http://www.personalgenomes.org/ (last visited Apr.
Another effort to increase the number of genomes accessible for public research is the Personal Genome Project ("PGP").
Similar biobanks have emerged in the United States, including the Personal Genome Project, the NuGene Project, Mayo Clinic Biobank, and Kaiser Permanente's Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health.
As a director of 23andMe, a consumer genetics start-up, and a participant in the Personal Genome Project research study (http://www.personalgenomes.org/public/3.html#Data_Sets), I have been studying how genes affect one's chances of getting various diseases, and how much impact behavior can have on those chances.
Still, scientists and legislators have been working to anticipate the coming deluge of sequencing data: See Harvard's Personal Genome Project, which seeks to sequence 100,000 genomes, or the recently passed Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which bars insurance providers or employers from using DNA sequence data against policyholders or employees.
It is based on the first 10 sequences of the Personal Genome Project, which aims to sequence the genomes of up to 100 000 individuals and integrate complete phenotype and other biological data (45).
This Article examines the risks and benefits of this public genomics model in the context of an ambitious genetic research project currently under way--the Personal Genome Project. This Article also (i) demonstrates that large-scale genomic projects are desirable, (ii) evaluates the risks and challenges presented by public genomics research, and (iii) determines that the current legal and regulatory regimes restrict beneficial and responsible scientific inquiry while failing to adequately protect participants.
It is also the answer to another question I hear a lot because of my work on human genetics through 23andMe ( www.23andme.com ) and the Personal Genome Project ( www.personalgenome.org ): If you learned you had a high chance of developing Alzheimer's in a few years, what would you do?

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