Personal Genome Project


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Related to Personal Genome Project: Human Genome Project

Personal Genome Project

An endeavor organized by George Church of Harvard University to sequence the genomes of 100,000 volunteers while recording their personal history. First launched in 2007, the goal of the Personal Genome Project (PGP) is to determine relationships between a person's genetic makeup (genomics), their environment and their physical traits (phenomics). Involved in DNA sequencing since the 1980s, Church's Polonator multiplexing machine sequences genes faster than traditional methods. For more information, visit www.personalgenomes.org. See Human Genome Project.
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2009) "Eyes wide open: the personal genome project, citizen science and veracity informed consent.
12, 2011); see also Newsletter #1, PERSONAL GENOME PROJECT (Apr.
In addition to public efforts like the Personal Genome Project, private personal genome sequencing companies have sprouted up.
Some genetic research initiatives in the United States, like the Personal Genome Project and the Mayo Clinic Biobank, and some genetic studies that recruit participants for clinical drug trials use the same "broad consent" approach that the UK Biobank does.
As a director of 23andMe, a consumer genetics start-up, and a participant in the Personal Genome Project research study (http://www.
Still, scientists and legislators have been working to anticipate the coming deluge of sequencing data: See Harvard's Personal Genome Project, which seeks to sequence 100,000 genomes, or the recently passed Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which bars insurance providers or employers from using DNA sequence data against policyholders or employees.
It is based on the first 10 sequences of the Personal Genome Project, which aims to sequence the genomes of up to 100 000 individuals and integrate complete phenotype and other biological data (45).
This Article examines the risks and benefits of this public genomics model in the context of an ambitious genetic research project currently under way--the Personal Genome Project.
George Church, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and founder of the Personal Genome Project, will give a keynote on the state of the DTC genetics field.
The GET Conference 2010 marks the last opportunity in history to gather a majority of individuals in the world with public personal genome sequences in a single venue," says George Church, founder and principal investigator of the Personal Genome Project and professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School.
Church, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, director of the Center for Computational Genetics, and member of Complete Genomics' Scientific Advisory Board, described his experience: "As part of the Personal Genome Project, we have had a single human genome sequenced by Complete Genomics.
George Church, PhD, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and founder of the Personal Genome Project (as seen on PBS)

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