general aviation

(redirected from Personal aviation)
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Related to Personal aviation: Private aviation

general aviation

[′jen·rəl ‚ā·vē′ā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
All aviation activity not associated with either certificated air carriers or the military, including business uses, commuter airlines, air taxi operators, various commercial applications, and personal flying.

general aviation

All aviation operations, excluding airlines and military aviation. It includes, but is not limited to, business flying, agricultural aviation, personal flying for pleasure or sports, and flying by flight-training institutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The numbers came from the Nall Report and they used active pilots in personal aviation, excluding the commercial sector of GA.
It is said that the most dangerous things in personal aviation are sky above you, runway behind you and fuel in the truck.
When that happens (not if), personal aviation will finally realize its "flying car" promise, but all the fun and sense of accomplishment gained by actually flying an aircraft will be missing, thanks to the automation.
Looking for ways to minimize the consequences when something goes wrong pretty much defines risk management in personal aviation. But how we might go about it?
That part actually hasn't changed much over the years; personal aviation can have drastic consequences.
At first glance, it seems impossible for that part of general aviation we think of as personal aviation to ever come anywhere close to air carrier safety levels, which have been near-perfect every year since 2011.
Airline ops just seem different than personal aviation. The reality is both types of aviation require us to be on our toes, and abort a takeoff--safely--when things aren't right.
Any activity--even staying home watching television--poses risks, and personal aviation is no different.
Over the past several years, the FAA and industry have promoted establishing and adhering to personal minimums as a way to manage the risk inherent in personal aviation. These are viewed as self-imposed limitations based upon personal experience, training and certification, equipment or other factors.
It all can and likely will trickle down to personal aviation eventually.
There's no question the industry won't have a bright future if something isn't done to reverse the student-start and-completion trends, nor is there little argument we all need to do better at promoting and preserving personal aviation. At the same time, SAFE'S approach is focused more on the flight-training experience's quality: If we can't properly train people to fly a personal airplane, so the thinking might be summarized, why should anyone want to learn how in the first place?

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