Perspective Painting

Perspective Painting

 

a type of painting in which artistic expressiveness is based on the use of linear perspective. A decorative form of painting, it illusionistically expands real architectural space. Perspective painting was characteristic of the Renaissance and, more particularly, the baroque periods. It has also been used in set design. Examples of perspective painting are 17th- and 18th-century Italian landscapes known as vedute (by Canaletto, B. Bellotto, and others) and paintings for the decoration of interiors, which were especially popular in 17th-century Holland (by E. de Witte and others). In Russian art, the best-known works of this type were produced by masters of the Venetsianov school.

References in periodicals archive ?
But Renoir's scrupulosity extended to scenes in which the camera and the protagonists remain more static, where realism harkens to perspective painting.
Erwin Panofsky, amongst many others, has observed that the spatial unity of Renaissance perspective painting was used in similar ways, each depth plane being used to portray a different action and protagonist.
Again, the deep-space composition evokes the architectural--and narrative--hallmarks of Renaissance perspective painting.
The camera takes up the position of the viewer (seated on the floor) and frames the view of the garden from inside the house for the cinematic spectator, the on-screen effect becoming yet another plane of replication--but not in service of Western one-point perspective painting, an orientation that is actually thwarted by the dizzying horizontals that abound inside and across each plane.
Whenever we look at a perspective painting with a distant horizon we are seeing a certain kind of nonlinear mapping.
Instead of converging to a point, as in perspective painting, the log scale, as a single line marked at equal intervals, can, in principle, extend as far as we wish, and for display purposes it can appear either as a straight line or curved into a circle.
Giotto's breakthroughs in perspective painting in 14th-century Italy forever changed how we would view ourselves - both literally and figuratively - in relation to the universe.
The perspective painting appears both to empower us as subjects--everything in an illusionistic painting is, after all, related to the spectator's point of view--while at the same time insisting that the structure of what we see depends on objective principles that are quite independent of our subjectivity.
Damisch's ideas are worked out in a detailed analysis of three perspective paintings found, respectively, in Urbino, Baltimore, and Berlin.
The 80-year-old artist said he is currently working on reverse perspective paintings.
Chapter six explains in much detail the parts of Ptolemy's Optics that treat reflections on flat mirror surfaces and those parts that relate to painters' use of single viewpoints in constructing their perspective paintings.
In traditional perspective paintings, tiles and ceiling coffers are typically countable, to underscore the illusion of depth--so Matisse's inexact checkerboard subverts perspective illusion, and the painting in general subverts depth, since the table on which the checkerboard rests is not in the same plane as the boys playing on it but rather almost flush with the picture plane itself: Everything in the painting serves to flatten it forward and translate depth into mere pattern.