Perutz


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Perutz

Max Ferdinand. 1914--2002, British biochemist, born in Austria. With J. C. Kendrew, he worked on the structure of haemoglobin and shared the Nobel prize for chemistry 1962
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Max Perutz earned the 1962 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in the molecular structure of hemoglobin.
Bernal was often called "the Sage" by his colleagues, and Perutz thought him the most brilliant talker he had ever known and one who "soaked up knowledge from an early age like blotting paper.
Simon Perutz, a close friend of Grene's, as well as North American CEO of the P3 Group, participated in a three day bike ride from London to Paris that also raised money for the school.
Science writer Ferry illustrates the life and career of Vienna-born and Cambridge-educated scientist Max Perutz (1914-2002), the events of which include the founding of the research group in which Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA, a Nobel Prize for his exploration of the protein hemoglobin, deportation from England and subsequent return to work on a top-secret war project, and advancements in the study of glaciers and genetics, among others.
Max Perutz and Professor Herman Lehmann who first stimulated my interest in hemoglobinopathies and to various commanders in the Royal Air Force and Special Air Service for much assistance.
Moskowitz, "Ever since Max Perutz showed the molecular defect in sickle cell hemoglobin in 1946, for which he won the Nobel Prize, sickle cell disease has been a sober reminder that knowing the molecular cause of a disease is still a far cry from curing it.
Penny Perutz set up an internet art gallery after her two children had left the family home and she suddenly found she had time on her hands.
Perutz of Cambridge University's Laboratory of Molecular Biology, winner of the 1962 Nobel prize in chemistry for solving the crystal structure of hemoglobin.
in Biochemistry from Rockefeller University in 1967, and studied as a postdoctoral fellow with Nobel Prize winner Max Perutz in Cambridge, England.
Max Perutz, molecular biologist and Nobel Prize winner 1962
I was extremely fortunate to be joined in Charleston by my son, Leigh Anderson, who had completed a PhD at the University of Cambridge under Nobel Prize winner Max Perutz and done a mini-postdoc there with Sydney Brenner.
Georgina Ferry (2007) recently published a biography of Max Perutz in which she chronicles the many difficulties he faced in his over 20-year effort to work out the structure of hemoglobin.