sugar glider

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sugar glider

a common Australian phalanger, Petaurus breviceps, that glides from tree to tree feeding on insects and nectar
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Table 13-1: Natural Diet of Pretaurus Breviceps NATURAL DIET OF PETAURUS BREVICEPS Natural Diet Ingredients/Source Eucalyptus Sap Sap is the fluid produced by plants and trees.
Nitrogen requirements of the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps), an omnivorous marsupial, on a honey-pollen diet.
Drury R (2014) The Use of Remote Cameras at the Nestboxes of Arboreal Mammals, Brush-tailed Phascogale Phascogale tapoatafa and Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps in the Rushworth State Forest.
Species Number of Number of study site transect appearances appearances (n=5) (n=13) Brush-tailed Phascogale Phascogale 2 2 tapoatafa Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus 4 11 vulpecula Common Ringtail Possum Pseudocheirus 1 1 peregrinus Feathertail Glider Acrobates pygmaeus 1 1 Eastern Pygmy Possum Cercartetus nanus 1 1 Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps 2 4 Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis 1 1 Yellow-footed Antechinus Antechinus 1 1 flavipes Table 3.
2 0.7 Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps 7 2.4 Common Ringtail Possum Pseudocheirus peregrinus 98 34.1 Long-nosed Potoroo Potorous tridactylus 1 0.3 Bush Rat Rattus fuscipes 61 21.3 Unidentified birds 10 3.5 Total prey items 287
Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps and Brushtailed Phascogale Phascogale tapoatafa (hereafter Phascogale), are the main users of these boxes, but other species such as the Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis, Yellow-footed Antechinus Antechinus flavipes, Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula and Common Ringtail Possum Pseudocheirus peregrinus have been recorded also (Myers and Dashper 1999).
Kortner G and Geiser F (2000) Torpor and activity patterns in free-ranging sugar gliders Petaurus breviceps (Marsupialia).
Myers S (1997) A note on the Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps. Use of Brush-tailed Phascogale Phascogale tapoatafa nests in nest boxes at Rushworth State Forest.
This difficulty of cross-cultural communication is nicely illustrated by the incorrect use of the Victorian Aboriginal name Tuan for Phascogale tapoatafa instead of Acrobates pygmaeus or Petaurus breviceps (Conole 1987, Hercus 1988, Scarlett 1988).