Petticoat Junction


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Petticoat Junction

farce set in rural America. [TV: Terrace, II, 205–206]
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With fascinating discussions of The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and other shows, Professor Eskridge reveals how the southern image was used to both entertain and reassure Americans in the turbulent 1960s.
He made guest appearances on TV shows "Lone Ranger," "Father Knows Best," "Leave It to Beaver" and "Petticoat Junction."
Henning's Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junction were such massive successes that CBS commissioned a third Henning show without even a pilot.
He directed the pilot of "77 Sunset Strip" as well as episodes of "Route 66," "Maverick," "Petticoat Junction" and "Nanny and the Professor."
The television show "Petticoat Junction" was based on a hotel that used to be in Eldon.
Edgar Buchanan (1903-1979) - One-time Eugene dentist who acted at The Very Little Theatre, went on to play Uncle Joe in the 1960s TV show, "Petticoat Junction."
Frank Cady, an actor best known for for his recurring and popular role as storekeeper Sam Drucker on the TV sitcoms "Green Acres" and "Petticoat Junction," died Friday at his home in Wilsonville, Ore.
"I play guitar, piano, contrabass clarinet, flute, tambourine, I write songs for instruments I can't even play," says Worcester musician Helen Sheldon Beaumont, who performs with the ska band Guns of Navarone as well as the Farmers Union Players and the vocal duet Petticoat Junction, which is performing Monday at Ralph's Chadwick Square Diner.
The popularity of television's rural comedies of the 1950s and 1960s--The Real McCoys, The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and Green Acres--suggests that the appeal of the hillbilly cannot be merely a matter of its making the audience feel superior.
Henning also produced the Beverly Hillbillies and had TV success with the series Petticoat Junction and Green Acres.
What we ended up with was "Petticoat Junction." Cable was supposed to bring us broad access to art and communication--self-produced and decentralized.
Through the 1960s CBS led the ratings with rural hits such as "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "Petticoat Junction" that drew audiences who had grown up in the Great Depression and wanted stories on the tube to portray simpler times.