incision

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incision

1. a cut made with a knife during a surgical operation
2. any indentation in an incised leaf

incision

[in′sizh·ən]
(medicine)
A cut or wound of the body tissue, as an abdominal incision or a vertical or oblique incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
A nodule painful to palpation was found in the medial part of previous Pfannenstiel incision. Findings of routine laboratory analyses were completely normal, excluding anemia.
Loos et al found recurrent Pfannenstiel incision to be a significant risk factor for chronic pain (9), but our data did not show an increased incidence of chronic pain among patients who had a previous caesarean delivery.
We describe a rare case of hernia appendicitis through a Pfannenstiel incision.
All patients had a Pfannenstiel incision and all skin sutures were inserted subcutaneously: PGA (absorbable), straight needle size 2/0, continuous suture (Ethicon); nylon (non-absorbable) monofilament, curved needle size 2-0, interrupted sutures (Clinisut); and staples (interrupted placement) (Smith & Nephew)).
Somatic pain after a Pfannenstiel incision corresponds to the L1-L2 dermatomes and is transmitted by the iliohypogastric and ilio-inguinal (IHII) nerves.
Complete evaluation of the myometrial thickness likely could not have been accomplished through a Pfannenstiel incision. Had the transparent myometrial wall and engorged vessels been visualized at the initial laparotomy, delivery would undoubtedly have been performed.
During Caesarean section, a Pfannenstiel incision is preferred; this involves a transverse incision of 8-12 cm across the fascia of the rectus sheath, external oblique, internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscles supra-pubically.
MAUI, HAWAII -- A Pfannenstiel incision is as likely to come apart as a vertical one, despite what some medical textbooks maintain about its superior strength.
Pfannenstiel incision of prior CS was noted in lower abdomen.
The most current and the previous cesarean operations performed by the surgeons in the study involved cutting the skin and the subcutaneous tissue transversely at 2 cm above the pubic bone (Pfannenstiel incision) under general and spinal anesthesia, then blunt dissecting the rectus sheath with a finger, and entering the abdomen.