Phaeacia

Phaeacia

(fēā`shə), in Greek mythology, island of Scheria (location unknown). It was inhabited by a seafaring people who were hospitable to sailors and fond of joyous, luxurious living. When Odysseus was shipwrecked on their coast, their king, Alcinoüs, and his daughter, Nausicaä, entertained him.
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Finally, in The world of Homer (1910) he noted that morally objectionable material, such as incest on the island of Phaeacia (Od.
37) Homer's account gives us no strong cause to criticize Nausicaa's behavior, although we may suspect that standards of behavior and gender hierarchies on Phaeacia differ from those on Ithaca.
The play consists of two acts of uneven sizes: act 1 comprises fifteen scenes and enacts a brief appearance of Odysseus among his fellow warriors, a mini-Telemachy, Phaeacia, the Cyclops, and Hades; act 2 contains six scenes and depicts the Sirens, Scylla and Charybdis, Odysseus's meeting with Athena on Ithaca, his encounter with Eumaeus and reunions with Eurykleia and Telemachus inverted, a brief bow-contest, the slaughter of the suitors, and finally, his reunion with Penelope.
The leap from Equiano's account of Eboan dance to the court of Phaeacia in The Odyssey is anything but obvious--though one wonders whether Wollstonecraft's acute sensibility may have detected it as she framed her review.
But from this nightmarish fairy land Odysseus finds himself tossed up on Phaeacia, a country out of romance but of a very different sort from any he has previously tackled.
Two ways of representing the foreign - the empirical and the "culturally conditioned" - contribute to "early austral fiction," which Fausett traces back as far as Indian Ocean fictions of the Hellenistic Age, including Phaeacia in Homer's Odyssey, Plato's Atlantis, Theopompos of Chios's utopia from the mid-fourth-century B.
For example, he lauded the government of Phaeacia which is represented in the Odyssey as enjoying a blend of monarchy, aristocracy and democracy, a system, according to Mitford, 'not less marked than in the British constitution'.