Phaeacia

Phaeacia

(fēā`shə), in Greek mythology, island of Scheria (location unknown). It was inhabited by a seafaring people who were hospitable to sailors and fond of joyous, luxurious living. When Odysseus was shipwrecked on their coast, their king, Alcinoüs, and his daughter, Nausicaä, entertained him.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
68, "it is fairly clear that her (Arete) participation in the life of Phaeacia is based upon her husband's willingness to share authority: although Odysseus supplicates Arete, it is Alcinoos alone who has the power to accept him as a suppliant (7.
This is not a recently invented or particularly malicious practice; authors have been using it ever since Homer depicted the thoughts of Odysseus as he swam alone on the sea before coming ashore in Phaeacia.
288, where Odysseus describes his long slumber after he has washed ashore in Phaeacia.
Finally, in The world of Homer (1910) he noted that morally objectionable material, such as incest on the island of Phaeacia (Od.
37) Homer's account gives us no strong cause to criticize Nausicaa's behavior, although we may suspect that standards of behavior and gender hierarchies on Phaeacia differ from those on Ithaca.
3, Tibullus is sick nearly to death on Corfu, or, as he claims, Phaeacia, and he bids farewell to the departing Messalla, who leaves him behind and abandoned.
The play consists of two acts of uneven sizes: act 1 comprises fifteen scenes and enacts a brief appearance of Odysseus among his fellow warriors, a mini-Telemachy, Phaeacia, the Cyclops, and Hades; act 2 contains six scenes and depicts the Sirens, Scylla and Charybdis, Odysseus's meeting with Athena on Ithaca, his encounter with Eumaeus and reunions with Eurykleia and Telemachus inverted, a brief bow-contest, the slaughter of the suitors, and finally, his reunion with Penelope.
The leap from Equiano's account of Eboan dance to the court of Phaeacia in The Odyssey is anything but obvious--though one wonders whether Wollstonecraft's acute sensibility may have detected it as she framed her review.
But most important, we learn the majority of the seafaring adventu res from Odysseus himself, as he narrates them to his hosts, the King and Queen of Phaeacia, on whose land he has become shipwrecked.
For example, Homeric Phaeacia revealed a "mixture of monarchy, aristocracy and democracy not less marked than in the British constitution.
Rather than have Odysseus outline once again some of his key adventures for Penelope and Laertes as Homer does, Walcott relies on a comic sequence of doubled characters: mermaids who teased Odysseus on his raft before he washed ashore in Phaeacia become flirtatious kitchen servants in Ithaca; Nausicaa reappears as Penelope's insolent maid Melantho; Polyphemos turns up again as the troublesome swineherd Arnaeus, to whom Odysseus gives the one-fingered "Cyclops salute" (124-27).
But from this nightmarish fairy land Odysseus finds himself tossed up on Phaeacia, a country out of romance but of a very different sort from any he has previously tackled.