Phaeacians


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Phaeacians

island people befriend and aid both Odysseus and the Argonauts. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 780]
References in periodicals archive ?
Phaeacians, both famed for their ships and nautical skill, and then locates them at opposite ends of the exchange spectrum [.
The Phaeacians and the Symbolism of Odysseus' Return.
For instance, Culture Shock, a local hip-hop crew, could play the "super-athletic Phaeacians," because they were already better athletes than any professional actors the artistic team could train.
11), of Joshua's spies to the Harlot Rahab before the siege of Jericho (Joshua 2), of Telemachus to the home of Nestor (Homer, Odyssey 3) and to the home of Menelaus and Helen (Homer, Odyssey 4), and of Odysseus to a variety of hosts and hostesses, most notably the Phaeacians.
The Odyssey exposes the dangers in making life into a song to be enjoyed, as the Phaeacians do, with the result that they lose touch with reality and are consigned to everlasting oblivion.
Even the fantastic adventures that he narrates to the Phaeacians and for which he is famous consist of many trials that seem the opposite of heroic, such as helplessly witnessing his men being devoured by the Cyclops or Skylla.
Like the audience of Phaeacians, Americans have listened attentively to the stories of soldiers returning from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and tried to evaluate, with inevitable frustration, the moral and psychological impact of war on the self.
This passage occurs in the part of the Odyssey where Odysseus is narrating his own adventures to an audience of Phaeacians, with the result that Odysseus himself is the speaker of this simile, just as Achilles was the speaker of the simile comparing himself to a mother bird.
It may be noted that in Heliodorus, when Calasiris interrupts his compelling, Odysseus-like, narrative, on the Odysseus-like grounds that it is time to go to sleep, Cnemon is not reported to "marvel in silence", as the Phaeacians are when Odysseus stops.
The earliest lists of Morning Exercises, from 1897, include the name of the supervising teacher, the title of a poem to be recited, insofar as possible related to the topic for the Exercise, and the titles of the Exercise: "The Skies," "The Lapps," "Winter Sports," "Ulysses among the Phaeacians," "Music," "Michael Angelo," "Number," "The English View of the American Revolution," and "Selections from Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.
Homer's Odysseus reports to the Phaeacians that Ithaca is a rugged land (Odyssey, 9.
These opposing values may even have a much longer history in the Western tradition than Crawford suggests, especially if we consider portrayals from classical antiquity; compare the steady sobriety and industry of the Phaeacians, for instance, with the oblivion and loss of self represented by the Lotus Eaters in Homer's Odyssey (Fitzgerald 1961).