Scheria

(redirected from Phaiakian)

Scheria

 

in ancient Greek mythology, a legendary island in habited by the Phaeacians and the last place visited by Odysseus before he returned home. In antiquity, Scheria was sometimes identified with the island of Corcyra (Corfu).

References in periodicals archive ?
In Book 6, when Nausikaa advises Odysseus to ask for hospitality at her father's house, but she warns him that, before arriving in town, he must separate from her and her maid servants, in order to avoid the distrain ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) of the Phaiakian people {Od.
While Arendt finds in the festivities at the Phaiakian palace in Odyssey 8 a perfect correspondence between poetic language and memory, Schestag finds a forgetful remainder, emblematized in Odysseus's tears, that does not bring the past forward, but instead inarticulably reminds us of its passing.
Nonetheless, even frank, clear-eyed awareness of the passage of time somehow doesn't prepare Odysseus to recognize home when at last the Phaiakian sailors leave him sleeping in an olive-shaded Ithakan cove, where he awakes confused by a grey mist poured all around him by Athena.
From Book Nine to Twelve, the center of the poem, Odysseus, having survived a great storm, conquers the Phaiakian audience by recounting his deeds.
The Phaiakian reunion will instead take a different form.
13.75 (Odysseus was lying down on the Phaiakian ship) or katalexai at 19.44 (Odysseus tells Telemachos to go to bed), whereas katelexas at Od.
Judging by the Phaiakian model, it would appear that a good politician must be a good gardener and that that the ideal city is founded on a well-ordered landscape.
The Phaiakians, though depicted as something like connoisseurs of epic poetry, who hear multiple songs about him and his exploits (8.73-83, 486-521), are not only unable to recognize him in their midst, but fail to recognize that the prophecy they earlier received (8.564-71, 13.172-78), clearly designates the man before them.
Eventually a gentle tide washes him up on the shore of Skeria, land of the Phaiakians, hospitable people who welcome him.
According to Giesecke, the various beings that Odysseus encounters can be arranged on a scale from most human and civilized--the Phaiakians, the Laestrygonians, and the Aeolian--to the most despicable and natural: the Lotus Eaters, Circe, and the Cyclops.
If we recall narrative scenes such as the incognito Odysseus no longer able to hide his weeping as he hears the minstrel's tales on the island of the Phaiakians, it will be obvious that this phenomenon belongs to the powers of narrative of all times, yet it seems to me that Cervantes carries these capabilities to unheard-of extremes.
The parallels Scott draws between Highland and Homeric society derive not from the Iliad, with its battlefield gore and contentious personalities, but from the Odyssey, with its emphasis on arts and hospitality.(8) When Waverley arrives at Fergus Mac Ivor's castle of Glennaquoich, the clan not only perform a series of military exercises to the sound of a bagpipe, they also engage in foot races, wrestling matches, and contests at pitching the bar, in which they exhibit their athletic skills for their visitor just as the Phaiakians did for Odysseus when he visited their land.