phallus

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phallus

1. another word for penis
2. an image of the penis, esp as a religious symbol of reproductive power

Phallus

 

a genus of fungi of the order Gasteromycetes. In the USSR the most widespread are P. impudicus, found in forests and brushwood on fertile soil, and P. hadriani, found in sand. The young fruiting bodies of Phallus are ovoid; later their membrane ruptures and the fruit bearer appears, consisting of a long peduncle and a conical, alveolate cap covered with greenish slime that has the unpleasant odor of carrion.

phallus

[′fal·əs]
(anatomy)
(embryology)
An undifferentiated embryonic structure derived from the genital tubercle that differentiates into the penis in males and the clitoris in females.
References in periodicals archive ?
If we remember that viscosity is the inherent property which prevents free flow in that which is nevertheless fluid, we can find in semen a symbol that can supplement our conventional notion of static phallicism.
If, during the mid- to late-nineteenth century, the forces of phallicism demanded rigid roles defined by the binaries heterosexual/homosexual and masculine/feminine, then clearly here something else is allowing slippage in and among the behaviors commonly associated with those terms.
Major does this by subverting the paradigm of Calibanic phallicism with black phallic tricksterism, in the process, he changes the black phallus from a symbol of pollution to one of productivity and proliferating meanings.
Most importantly, Eli tries to open linguistic space in the imprisoning discourse of Calibanic phallicism with his methods of black phallic tricksterism.
Martin's words: "Like the exaggerated phallus of Greek comedy, the constant phallicism of Moby-Dick is a counterweight to its epic and tragic force and a reminder of its fundamentally comic structure.
If shared emotion so compromises phallicism, can a man survive this invasion of sentimental "weakness"?
Nothing reveals this crude, physical phallicism more than the fact that the gun, the machete, and the cudgel (for wife-beating and child beating), three over-literal extensions of an aggressive, neurotic masculinist identity, are Okonkwo's ultimate answers to any and all crises, and we see this in several incidents in the novel: the incident with the beating of his second wife during the peace week; the episode of the severe beating of his son, Nwoye, when the unhappy youth was spotted among the new community of Christian converts; and the climactic moment of the novel which results in Okonkwo's beheading of the first in the line of the advancing party of the hirelings of the colonial administration who had come to break up the village assembly at the end of the novel.