Phan Dinh Phung


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Phan Đình Phùng 潘廷逢
BirthplaceĐông Thái, Đức Thọ, Hà Tĩnh, Vietnam
Died

Phan Dinh Phung

 

Born 1847 in Ha Tinh Province, Central Vietnam; died December 1895. Vietnamese state figure, a leader of the can vuong uprising against the French colonialists.

A court censor by profession, Phan Dinh Phung in 1885 roused the peasants and civil servants of Huong Khe District of Nghe An Province to armed rebellion against the French colonialists. By 1893 the revolt had spread throughout most of Nghe An and the provinces of Ha Tinh, Quang Binh, and Thanh Hoa. The rebels formed an army, arranged for the manufacture of weapons, and inflicted a number of defeats on the French troops. Soon after the death of Phan Dinh Phung, the uprising was suppressed by French punitive forces.

References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to the quick work of a match referee, no-one was injured when 40 square metres (430 square feet) of plaster ceiling collapsed onto the court in a cloud of debris at the Phan Dinh Phung Stadium in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday.
David Marr, for example, made the theme of "Vietnamese anticolonialism" and its transmission from nineteenth-century figures (such as Phan Dinh Phung) to twentieth-century ones (such as Phan Boi Chau and Ho Chi Minh) the leitmotif of his pioneering work on the genesis of modern Vietnamese nationalism.(2) One less-felicitous result of Western scholarship's interest in nineteenth-century resistance figures is its relative neglect of the "advocates of peace", who have been the subject of few articles and received no book-length treatment.
And candidates were so attentive to the prevailing winds that, at the 1877 competition, negative responses were almost unanimous to a question asking whether or not Japan had benefitted from its Westernizing reforms.(25) Highest honours went to Phan Dinh Phung, whose essay regurgitated the official view that the potential technical benefits of Western studies were counterbalanced by their inherent threat to classical morality: