pharmacogenetics

(redirected from Pharmacogenomics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

pharmacogenetics

[¦fär·mə·kō·jə′ned·iks]
(genetics)
The science of genetically determined variations in drug responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aforementioned fact is responsible for the estimated revenue share of cancer in pharmacogenomics technology market.
Providing searchable annotations of pharmacogenetic variants, PharmGKB summarizes the clinical implications of important pharmacogenes, and includes FDA drug labels containing pharmacogenomics information (https://www.
We believe that the combination of our technological skills with the considerable clinical and informatics expertise of the Montreal Heart Institute could truly unlock the promise of pharmacogenomics.
Clinical Data is working to move the use of pharmacogenomics into the clinical care setting; to do this in the United States it is important to choose partners that provide for channels of distribution of this new technology to physicians and patients and aid in the appropriate use of this technology.
3 Pressure to Optimize Drug Discovery Drives Use of Pharmacogenomics 60
CompanionDx Reference Lab specialises in pharmacogenomics, cancer companion diagnostics, targeted next-generation sequencing and epigenomics testing.
Pharmacogenomics allows health care providers to identify sources of an individual's profile of drug response and predict the best possible treatment option for that individual.
Just as genomics is the study of the entire genome while genetics is the study of individual genes, pharmacogenomics looks at inheritable response to drugs over the entire genome while pharmacogenetics identifies interactions between drugs and individual genes.
Invitrogen scientists will support research programs at the Pharmacogenomics Centre to improve the efficiency and speed with which researchers can identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), differences in single base pairs that typically occur in more than one percent of the population.
Since completion of the human genome project in the early 2000s, the field of pharmacogenomics has advanced, and using pharmacogenomic testing to make therapeutic decisions for medication management is becoming commonplace.
Genetic testing is widely prevalent within oncology and pharmacogenomics, and is quickly spreading to chronic care, cardiology, and children's medicine.