Pharsalus


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Related to Pharsalus: Philippi, Thapsus

Pharsalus

(fär`säləs), ancient city, Thessaly, Greece. Near there in 48 B.C., Julius Caesar decisively defeated Pompey, who had a much larger force. Lucan's Bellum Civile (often called Pharsalia) is an epic of the civil war.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pharsalus

 

(now Farsala), a city in Greece, in the nome of Larisa in Thessaly. The Pharsalus area was the site of a decisive battle on June 6, 48 B.C., during the Roman Civil War of 49–45 B.C., between the troops of Julius Caesar (30,000 infantry and 1,000–2,000 cavalry) and Pompey the Great (more than 30,000 infantry and 3,000–4,000 cavalry). Caesar’s infantry attacked the enemy infantry from the front. On the flank, Pompey’s cavalry, diverted into pursuit of Caesar’s retreating cavalry, came under a flank attack by Caesar’s reserve infantry and was routed, whereupon Caesar’s cavalry and infantry emerged in the rear of the enemy’s infantry and surrounded them. Pompey fled by sea to Egypt, and his remaining troops (24,000 men) were taken captive. The fall of the republic was hastened by this victory of Caesar’s.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pharsalus

an ancient town in Thessaly in N Greece. Several major battles were fought nearby, including Caesar's victory over Pompey (48 bc)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 5 people from the Municipality of Pharsalus, 7 people from the organization Active Residents, 3 independent researchers, 6 history teachers at school and 20 local people.
(12) Labienus narrates the account of the battle at Pharsalus, highlighting the tragic aspects of the unlawful civil conflict.
The action of Corneille's play begins after the Battle of Pharsalus, with the news that the defeated Pompey is en route to Egypt in hopes of refuge from the victorious Julius Caesar.
On the level of the fiction, they prove to be unreliable sources which send the narrator off on wild-goose chases as he tries to locate the site of the Battle of Pharsalus or to find a literary model for the description of his own emotional state (Proust); they offer parallels with his own experiences of both love and war and act as reminders of incidents which he has repressed or wishes to repress.
This recounts Julius Caesar's victory over his rival Pompey at the battle of Pharsalus and Caesar's ensuing pursuit of his opponent to Egypt.
The real conflict was within the elite of senators and magistrates, families divided in partisanship, who would confront their brothers or sons-in-law face-to-face in battle at Pharsalus. This was the horror that made Lucan call the war "a powerful people turning against its own entrails with its victorious right hand" (1.2-3).
Balbus was a man of very definite importance in Cicero's political and social circle, and, after the battle of Pharsalus, a vital conduit of information to circles above that.
Lucan's account of the battle of Pharsalus (48 B.C.) is flanked by two dreams.
Poet and Roman republican patriot whose historical epic, the Bellum civile, better known as the Pharsalia because of its vivid account of the Battle of Pharsalus, is remarkable as the single major Latin epic poem that eschewed the intervention of the gods.
Principal battles: Bibracte (near Autun) (58), the Rhine (55), Alesia (Alise-Sainte Reine, near Montbard) (52), Ilerda (Lerida) (49), Pharsalus (Farsala) (48), Zela (Zile) (47), Thapsus (46), and Munda (in western Andalusia) (45).