Pheidippides


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Pheidippides
BirthplaceAthens

Pheidippides

(fīdĭp`ĭdēz), fl. 490 B.C., semilegendary Athenian courier sent to Sparta to request help when the Persians landed at Marathon. He ran 150 miles in two days. At the conclusion of the battle, he ran the 22 mi (35 km) back to Athens, where he reportedly shouted "Rejoice! We conquer!" and then died of exhaustion.
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Pheidippides

ran over 20 miles to Athens to announce victory at Marathon in 490 B.C., then died of exhaustion. [Gk. Legend: Collier’s, XIII, 369]

Pheidippides

his extravagant bets ruin father’s wealth. [Gk. Lit.: The Clouds]

Pheidippides

ran 26 miles from Marathon to Athens to carry news of Greek defeat of Persians. [Gk. Legend: Zimmerman, 159]

Pheidippides

(fl. 490 B.C.) ran 26 miles to Athens to announce Greek victory over Persians at Marathon. [Gk. Legend: Zimmerman, 159]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pheidippides

, Phidippides
5th century bc Athenian athlete, who ran to Sparta to seek help against the Persians before the Battle of Marathon (490 bc)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Athens Marathon race originates from the feat of Pheidippides who run from the Marathon battlefield to Athens to announce Greeks' victory over the Persian forces and died from exhaustion, inspiring modern Marathons.
Strepsiades, Twister, and his son Pheidippides, Spare the Horses, bear characteristic names, their characters standing in for conflicts between fathers and sons, for citizens worried about debt and trying to worm their way out of it.
Sanaz finished 215th out of the 3,880 women participating in the marathon, which covers a distance of 26 miles and 385 yards (42.195 kilometers), the assumed distance of the fabled run of the Greek soldier Pheidippides, the messenger who ran from the field of the battle of Marathon to tell Athens her army had defeated the invading army from, ahh, Persia.
is Aristophanes's comedy The Clouds, with the debt-ridden father, Strepsiades, urging his son, Pheidippides, to go to the Thinkery, not of course because he supposes that getting instruction from Socrates will make his son wise.
In The Clouds Strepsiades enrolls his son Pheidippides in Socrates' academy because (1) he himself is unable to intellectually handle the lessons of Socrates, and (2) he want to get out of paying his debts.
The history of the marathon begins with Pheidippides, a Greek military messenger.
Which athletic event commemorates Pheidippides, who carried to Athens news of a Greek victory over the Persians?
(73) Perhaps in a sense then the Euthyphro is Plato's answer to the Clouds: while the Clouds presents Socrates as an irreligious teacher of rhetoric who makes Pheidippides strike his own father, the Euthyphro presents a deeply committed theist, who lauds his rhetorical ability, prosecuting his own father; and while Aristophanes joins the 'new learning' with the impious abuse of one's father, Plato shows how a similar impiety can come from the old poets who Socrates takes issue with.
I would not dissent from this, except to note that the questions of who is acting violently, and how, are of critical importance: Pheidippides' father-beating would have been perceived, and was characterized, in strongly different terms from the assault on the thinking-shop.
a Greek messenger named Pheidippides was sent from the battlefield at Marathon to tell Athenians 25 miles away that the Persians had just been defeated.
The world's first marathon was run in 490 BC by a Greek soldier, Pheidippides, who ran the 26 miles (41.84 kilometres) from the battlefield in Marathon in ancient Greece to the rulers' court in Athens.
(9) Pheidippides and Epizelos' crisis apparitions during the Marathon campaign (6.105, 6.117) and the anonymous interpretation of a Pythian oracle about the "daughters of Asopos" (5.80), apparent exceptions, prove the rule: they are other anxious humans' perceptions and interpretations or they are hedged with "allegedly reported" qualifications.