Phenice


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Phenice

(fēnī`sē), in the New Testament. 1 Same as Phoenicia. 2 Harbor, SW Crete. It was also called Phoenix.
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Many Asian descendants believe that educational success leads to a better life, including higher social status, getting a good job, or a better marriage and relationships (Cheon, 2006; Hildebrand, Phenice, Gray, & Hines, 2008; Louie, 2004; Lien, 2006).
According to Phenice and Griffore (2003), regular, positive interactions with nature are instrumental to helping children develop a respect for the environment.
Positive attitudes about the environment are formed in early childhood and depend on frequent interaction with the natural environment (Cohen, 1992; Cohen & Horm-Wingerg, 1993; Phenice & Griffore, 2003; Sobel, 1990).
Tamberlaine thus possessed of Asia minor, which was before in the possession of the Turke, he speeded unto Aegypt, and by the way raised all Siria, Phenice, and the Palestine, he took manye famous Cities and among others Smirna, Antioch, Tripoli, Sebastian and Damas; in Aegypt he encountered with the Souldan, and the king of Arabia, and overthrew them.
Assessment of pelvic morphology confidently assigned this individual as female based on accepted standards (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994) including employment of the Phenice (1969) technique as some parts of the pubic bone were preserved.
29) Badius, under the enigmatic but suggestive pseudonym of Thrasibule Phenice, tells us so in the brief preface: despite the "sweet and friendly" admonitions so often reiterated, "le mal est tellement creu, qu'il n'est plus question de medicamens lenitifs, ains de cauteres et incisions: encores est-il bien a craindre que le tout pourrisse, tant le mal est enracine" (195).