Philemon and Baucis


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Philemon and Baucis,

in Greek mythology, Phrygian husband and wife. When Zeus and Hermes visited earth as men, only Philemon and Baucis offered them hospitality. As a reward they were saved from a punitive flood and were made priest and priestess to the gods. They died together and were turned into trees whose branches intertwined.
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Philemon and Baucis

fabled aged couple. [Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]

Philemon and Baucis

poor couple welcomes disguised gods refused by rich households. [Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]

Philemon and Baucis

couple turned into an oak and a linden so that they are together in death. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 698]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tale, which was depicted by such artists as Rembrandt ("Philemon and Baucis") and Peter Paul Rubens ("Stormy Landscape with Philemon and Baucis") was taken up and revised by Goethe in Part II, Act V of Faust, a passage which provides a vital intertext for the interpretation of Calvino's Baucis, especially for the implications of Goethe's rewriting of Ovid as a cautionary tale about modern urban planning.
The bell undermines Faust's sense of power and he desires to remove Philemon and Baucis: Faust....
Philemon and Baucis die as a sacrifice to the earthly desire of a man supported by a pact with the devil.
According to Muramoto, the decisive insight that Philemon imparted to Jung was that after Philemon and Baucis, whose earthly home was destroyed by Faust, there is no space for the reception of the gods but in his [Jung's] soul.
And Philemon and Baucis entwine for a final, eternal kiss as they turn into trees.
In the second part of Goethe's Faust, Philemon and Baucis are an old couple who refuse to sell their home at any price.
In "Philemon and Baucis," the title story of the other volume of Muravyova's stories under review, a former labor-camp commandant with a history of infidelity finally turns on his aging wife completely when her mental faculties begin to decline.
The present collection by Muravyova contains three stories: "The Nomadic Soul," "Lala, Natasha, Toma," and "Philemon and Baucis." The longest of the three, "The Nomadic Soul," is set primarily in Moscow during World War I and the Russian Civil War and considers the shifting fortunes of several members of an upper-class family.
The last of the stories, "Philemon and Baucis," is set decades later at a dacha outside Moscow, whose aging inhabitants are a caricature of antiquity's devoted spouses.