Philippe de Champaigne


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Champaigne, Philippe de

 

Baptized May 26, 1602, in Brussels; died Aug. 12, 1674, in Paris. French painter.

Champaigne worked in Paris from 1621. He executed ornamental compositions in palaces and churches, notably those in the Luxembourg Palace, on which he collaborated with N. Poussin. Influenced by Jansenism, Champaigne painted religious scenes distinguished for their ascetic restraint, such as The Last Supper (1648, the Louvre, Paris). In his severe, penetrating portraits he combined elements of Flemish realism and early French classicism; of special note are his likenesses of A. J. Richelieu, J. Mazarin, and A. d’Andilly. Champaigne also painted group portraits, notably, Two Nuns (1662, the Louvre).

REFERENCES

Mabille de Poncheville, A. Philippe de Champaigne. Paris, 1938.
Dorival, B. Philippe de Champaigne: Catalogue, 2nd ed. Paris, 1952.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 17th century, Philippe de Champaigne did his own version.
Loans from museums around the world form the basis of this exhibition of the work of Philippe de Champaigne, the 17th-century French painter.
'Philippe de Champaigne: Politics and Spirituality' at the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Lille, is the first monographic exhibition on the artist for 50 years (until 15 August).
Gervais is accompanied by his character David Brent's colleagues from The Office in a version of Philippe de Champaigne's The Last Supper.
Ricky Gervais is accompanied by his character David Brent's colleagues from The Office in a version of Philippe de Champaigne's The Last Supper.
Philippe de Champaigne's 1655 painting of the same name is eerie and symbolic, with its lone figure of Jesus accompanied only by a single skull.
More surprising in the records is the presence of that penetrating seventeenth-century artist Philippe de Champaigne, who was pursuing through the courts the recovery of a debt from the heirs of certain tenants.
Chapter 2 is devoted to representation (paintings, theatre, and books), and is perhaps the least satisfying chapter, for two main reasons: first, no reference is made to music, surely an essential ingredient of representation within and of the Church; second (no doubt owing to economic considerations), none of the Poussin and Philippe de Champaigne paintings Phillips analyses (albeit with subtlety and perception) is reproduced.