Philoctetes

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Philoctetes

(fĭlŏktē`tēz), in Greek mythology, son of Poias. He acquired, by gift, the bow and arrow of Hercules by lighting the pyre on which the hero was consumed alive. On his way to the Trojan War, Philoctetes was bitten by a snake. Because the smell of his wound and his cries made him offensive, his companions left him on the desolate island of Lemnos. When an oracle declared that Troy could not be taken without the weapons of Hercules, Philoctetes was brought to Troy by Neoptolemus (or Diomedes) and Odysseus. Sophocles' drama Philoctetes is based on the efforts of Neoptolemus and Odysseus to bring Philoctetes to Troy.

Philoctetes

Greek hero abandoned for ten years by his comrades because of the smell of his wound. [Gk. Drama: Sophocles Philoctetes in Benét, 783]

Philoctetes

Greek hero, bitten by a serpent, suffers agonies for ten years. [Gk. Drama: Sophocles Philoctetes in Magill III, 741]
References in periodicals archive ?
Volume 292 of the Mnemosyne Supplementa, this title argues a fundamental difference in the modes of expression of actor and chorus in Sophoklean tragedy, using Antigone and Philoktetes as examples.
It takes some bails, theatrically speaking, to open your play with the direct address, "Once again, it's time for you to shut up." Philoktetes himself (Cancelmi) delivers this suggestion as part of his opening salvo.
Philoktetes is doing this telling while standing in the middle of a large square video projection of gently rippling, very blue water-shorthand for the island on which the Greek archer was marooned by his former ally Odysseus (Will Badgett).
As he does in Sophocles' version of the story, Philoktetes spends quite a while communicating the nature, extent and circumstances of his suffering to his would-be captors, but Jesurun keeps Odysseus nearly silent, allowing Philoktetes to dominate.
He's also not interested in rehashing Sophocles' version of the story, in which Philoktetes goes back to war at the behest of the gods.
Ultimately, "Philoktetes" is more fun to write about than to watch or even hear.
describing Philoktetes's fate in Book 2 reveals subtle but strong
Philoktetes in his suffering, would later be in dire need of him