Philomela and Procne


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Philomela and Procne

(fĭlōmē`lə, prŏk`nē), in Greek mythology, daughters of King Pandion of Attica. Procne married Tereus, king of Thrace, and bore him a son, Itys (or Itylus). Tereus later seduced Philomela and cut out her tongue to silence her. Philomela embroidered the story into some cloth, which she sent to her sister. In revenge, Procne murdered Itys and served up his flesh to her husband. Tereus pursued and tried to kill the sisters, but the gods changed them all into birds. Philomela became a swallow, Procne a nightingale, and Tereus a hoopoe. Itys was revived and became a goldfinch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ovid symbolizes Philomela and Procne by their murder of Itylus: "And even so the red marks of the murder / stayed on their breasts; the feathers were blood-colored.
Jessica Levenstein examines the motif of Philomela and Procne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and treats their function in Dante's Purgatorio.
In an interview with Daniela Cavallaro (1994) Maraini acknowledges that the myth of Philomela and Procne inspired her novel (qtd.