philopatry

(redirected from Philopatric)
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philopatry

[‚fī·lə′pa·trē]
(ecology)
A dispersal method in which reproductive particles remain near their point of origin.
(psychology)
The drive to stay on or near the site of birth.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we investigated natal dispersal and inbreeding avoidance by focusing on a highly philopatric bird population nesting under natural conditions in an isolated archipelago.
We restrict analyses to females because they are strongly philopatric to their natal colony (Rohwer and Anderson 1988; M.
A comparison of matched pairs of sisters with different dispersal tendencies (one philopatric, one dispersing from the natal plot) suggested that dispersal will reduce reproductive success by 33% (calculated as the difference in number of young divided by the average for philopatric females; for data see Part 1991b).
Philopatric and nonphilopatric foundress associations in the social wasp Polistes fuscatus.
Relationships between inferred levels of gene flow and geographic distance in a philopatric coral.
We can expect such scenario in bluethroats with observed breeding site philopatry 53 % (own obs.), as arrival date of philopatric males advanced when they returned to the breeding site compared with their first breeding season at locality.
Previous studies have shown that this wide-ranging species has a high degree of site fidelity and exhibits philopatric behavior (Howey-Jordan et al., 2013; Madigan et al., 2015; Tolotti et al., 2015b).
2, Table 1): (1) the first is short distance (limited, localized, restricted, or philopatric), (2) the second is long distance (wide, pelagic, or diffusion), and (3) the third is dual dispersal that encompasses both short- and long-distance dispersal.
In our study, juvenile females appeared largely philopatric, and moved distances were similar to adult females (i.e.
The isolated distribution of eyeless southern stingray could be related with a philopatric behavior observed in elasmobranchs (Hueter et al., 2005), such behavior has been suggested for D.
Whether the females > males ratio is the result of female manipulation of the sex ratio of their offspring (Bond et al, 2003), sex-based variability in recruitment and survival (Bryja et al, 2005), population density and the nature of interaction between philopatric females (Lambin, 1994), or dominant males disallowing subordinate males to breed (Jannett, 1981) is less clear.
Four predictions were proposed: 1) Carollia has preferences for plants of the genus Piper, 2) Piper and other plants are eaten in similar proportions by other frugivores, 3) similarities in bat morphology are reflected in their diet preferences, and 4) Carollia populations are philopatric, in accordance with pipilongo availability.